Anonymous:

Why are you against keeping wild snakes if you rescue them yourself or find them in your home?

gingers-pet-parade:

i-m-snek:

Its sort of a moral thing for myself, especially if they are fairly common in the hobby. If they are readily available, why keep one from the wild when there are healthy captive bred ones? Especially if they are adults, it is a little more difficult to get them to acclimate to captivity as well. *shrug* 🙂

My turtle was born and spent most of his life on the wild. He was taken from the wild, and kept in captivity too long to be released. He went to an adoption, and then to me.

I love him to pieces, but there’s always this part of me that wishes I’d never met him. I see what he has now (the best I can give him), and know how it pales in comparison to the life he could have had. So much space. So much freedom. Everytime I see him bask, scratch at the walls of his tupperware, soak. Everytime I see him stare out at the trees (when I take him out for exercise), I’m reminded of the life that was stolen from him.

So yeah, definitely a moral thing. When I initially got him, I was so desperate for a boxie, I probably would’ve kept a wild one if I’d found it. Looking back, I’m horrified at the thought.

My point is; taking animals from the wild (when the wild is safe for them, when they are not endangered, and when they are healthy) is going to change the animal’s life permanently, in a way you’ll never be able to understand. Even the best captive situations do not compare to the wild. I understand where you’re coming from! Totally! But I think you might regret it later.

Sorry for the lecture!!

Anonymous:

is it possible for a turtle to be afraid of eating in front of people? mine will stop eating or drinking whenever someone walks by and will look at that person till they are out of sight!

gingerthesnap:

the-awkward-turt:

Yes, that’s very normal. Eating is a vulnerable time for turtles, with their head down and occupied with the food they can’t be as watchful for predators. It’s very natural for them to keep an eye on any possible “threats” and not eat until they are gone.

Is your turtle in an aquarium? Land turtles and tortoises don’t do well in enclosures with clear sides because 1) they don’t understand how glass works and will incessantly try to walk through clear sides and 2) they will feel very exposed on all sides and can be stressed. Moving your turtie to a bin or turtle table may help him/her be less nervous about eating and be overall less stressed.

Hope that helps!

My turtle does this all the time. I couldn’t be in the room while he ate for WEEKS after I bought him. You can try to put food under something covered, like a plant, or feed them when they’re sticking their lil turtle head out of a hide.

Anonymous:

is it possible for a turtle to be afraid of eating in front of people? mine will stop eating or drinking whenever someone walks by and will look at that person till they are out of sight!

gingerthesnap:

the-awkward-turt:

Yes, that’s very normal. Eating is a vulnerable time for turtles, with their head down and occupied with the food they can’t be as watchful for predators. It’s very natural for them to keep an eye on any possible “threats” and not eat until they are gone.

Is your turtle in an aquarium? Land turtles and tortoises don’t do well in enclosures with clear sides because 1) they don’t understand how glass works and will incessantly try to walk through clear sides and 2) they will feel very exposed on all sides and can be stressed. Moving your turtie to a bin or turtle table may help him/her be less nervous about eating and be overall less stressed.

Hope that helps!

My turtle does this all the time. I couldn’t be in the room while he ate for WEEKS after I bought him. You can try to put food under something covered, like a plant, or feed them when they’re sticking their lil turtle head out of a hide.