reptilefacts:

The Smithsonian’s National Zoo is celebrating a conservation milestone; for the first time, a rare Spider Tortoise has hatched in the Reptile Discovery Center. Animal care staff are closely monitoring the hatchling, which emerged May 10 in an off-exhibit area.

Spider Tortoises are listed as “Critically Endangered” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Native to the forests and sandy coastlines of Madagascar, their populations have declined by 80 percent since 1970, and populations continue to dwindle due to habitat loss and wildlife trafficking for the food and pet trade.

Follow the link to ZooBorns, to learn more.
Photo Credits: Connor Mallon at Smithsonian’s National Zoo

INCREDIBLE NEWS! And an INCREDIBLE shell! Go #SpiderTort Go!

Aw man, Lets go for a some common snakes or something instead ok? Give these beauties a break! 

Last Stand of the Madagascar Spider Tortoise

The spider tortoise – one of the rarest tortoises in the world – is the equivalent of a microwave meal for the Mikea, a hardy Madagascan forest tribe.

The method is simple: bury tortoise in heated sand, wait 20 minutes, slurp superheated innards.

“It even comes in its own bowl,” explains Solo, a seasoned tortoise hunter, although, he adds, “It’s hard to get big or fat or full from eating such small animals.”

Due to the Mikea and a slew of other threats, the spider tortoise is hurtling towards extinction. Could a newly identified population rescue them from the brink or are the odds against them too high?

Under a worst case scenario, scientists calculate that spider tortoises could disappear in a matter of a few decades: less than a single tortoise’s lifespan. 

Aw man, Lets go for a some common snakes or something instead ok? Give these beauties a break! 

Last Stand of the Madagascar Spider Tortoise

The spider tortoise – one of the rarest tortoises in the world – is the equivalent of a microwave meal for the Mikea, a hardy Madagascan forest tribe.

The method is simple: bury tortoise in heated sand, wait 20 minutes, slurp superheated innards.

“It even comes in its own bowl,” explains Solo, a seasoned tortoise hunter, although, he adds, “It’s hard to get big or fat or full from eating such small animals.”

Due to the Mikea and a slew of other threats, the spider tortoise is hurtling towards extinction. Could a newly identified population rescue them from the brink or are the odds against them too high?

Under a worst case scenario, scientists calculate that spider tortoises could disappear in a matter of a few decades: less than a single tortoise’s lifespan.