Sherri Fields of Punta Gorda, FL is a Hero. After cohabiting with an increasing number of gopher tortoises and their burrow, she was horrified to discover city works destroying these tortoises’ peaceful habitat, even if it was unintended.This woman took the ‘see something, say something’ philosophy we tout so often these days,and used it to protect her non human neighbors. While she sadly points out that it will not save those whose burrows have already been affected, she has done much to bring attention to the innocent, state protected, bystanders being harmed by this clean up attempt. Garnering media attention and alerting the city, she’s most definitely on the tortoise ‘nice’ list for her efforts. To that I give Sherri a high five and hope that we all take a tip from her actions, keeping an eye out for all our shelled friends… in and out of the water. 

Read the article below and click the source to view the news video of Sherri and her neighborhood tortoises in action. 

(Source: WINK News Now)

PUNTA GORDA, Fl. – Sherri Fileds has lived in this neighborhood for 20 years.  One thing she loves, sharing the property with the burrowing wildlife.

“These turtles have taken over the end of this creek bank and there are a lot of turtles here and this has been their safety zone for 20 years,” she says.

It’s why she was so upset Monday when she saw the place these state protcted tortoises live torn up.

“Look at how they left this…. I mean this looks like a war zone here… this area didn’t look this bad when hurricane Charley came through,” she adds.

County Public Worls crews say they were doing maintencance work and clearing the area so heavy rains wouldn’t cause drainage backups.

“Any kind of commercial, industrial, residential development you have to abide by the regulations. there is a whole series of them,” says retired consulting ecologist, Nigel Morris.

Florida Fish and Wildlife officials say, gopher tortoises are supposed to be relocated before any land clearing or development can take place.  But public works officials say, they didn’t know there were nests here.  They have stopped the job and removed their eqitment.  They are alos bring in an environmentalist to survey the area for burrows.

“I know going forward this may help other gopher turtles… but it’s not helping the ones that are dying today,” Fields adds.

Sherri Fields of Punta Gorda, FL is a Hero. After cohabiting with an increasing number of gopher tortoises and their burrow, she was horrified to discover city works destroying these tortoises’ peaceful habitat, even if it was unintended.This woman took the ‘see something, say something’ philosophy we tout so often these days,and used it to protect her non human neighbors. While she sadly points out that it will not save those whose burrows have already been affected, she has done much to bring attention to the innocent, state protected, bystanders being harmed by this clean up attempt. Garnering media attention and alerting the city, she’s most definitely on the tortoise ‘nice’ list for her efforts. To that I give Sherri a high five and hope that we all take a tip from her actions, keeping an eye out for all our shelled friends… in and out of the water. 

Read the article below and click the source to view the news video of Sherri and her neighborhood tortoises in action. 

(Source: WINK News Now)

PUNTA GORDA, Fl. – Sherri Fileds has lived in this neighborhood for 20 years.  One thing she loves, sharing the property with the burrowing wildlife.

“These turtles have taken over the end of this creek bank and there are a lot of turtles here and this has been their safety zone for 20 years,” she says.

It’s why she was so upset Monday when she saw the place these state protcted tortoises live torn up.

“Look at how they left this…. I mean this looks like a war zone here… this area didn’t look this bad when hurricane Charley came through,” she adds.

County Public Worls crews say they were doing maintencance work and clearing the area so heavy rains wouldn’t cause drainage backups.

“Any kind of commercial, industrial, residential development you have to abide by the regulations. there is a whole series of them,” says retired consulting ecologist, Nigel Morris.

Florida Fish and Wildlife officials say, gopher tortoises are supposed to be relocated before any land clearing or development can take place.  But public works officials say, they didn’t know there were nests here.  They have stopped the job and removed their eqitment.  They are alos bring in an environmentalist to survey the area for burrows.

“I know going forward this may help other gopher turtles… but it’s not helping the ones that are dying today,” Fields adds.

Sherri Fields of Punta Gorda, FL is a Hero. After cohabiting with an increasing number of gopher tortoises and their burrow, she was horrified to discover city works destroying these tortoises’ peaceful habitat, even if it was unintended.This woman took the ‘see something, say something’ philosophy we tout so often these days,and used it to protect her non human neighbors. While she sadly points out that it will not save those whose burrows have already been affected, she has done much to bring attention to the innocent, state protected, bystanders being harmed by this clean up attempt. Garnering media attention and alerting the city, she’s most definitely on the tortoise ‘nice’ list for her efforts. To that I give Sherri a high five and hope that we all take a tip from her actions, keeping an eye out for all our shelled friends… in and out of the water. 

Read the article below and click the source to view the news video of Sherri and her neighborhood tortoises in action. 

(Source: WINK News Now)

PUNTA GORDA, Fl. – Sherri Fileds has lived in this neighborhood for 20 years.  One thing she loves, sharing the property with the burrowing wildlife.

“These turtles have taken over the end of this creek bank and there are a lot of turtles here and this has been their safety zone for 20 years,” she says.

It’s why she was so upset Monday when she saw the place these state protcted tortoises live torn up.

“Look at how they left this…. I mean this looks like a war zone here… this area didn’t look this bad when hurricane Charley came through,” she adds.

County Public Worls crews say they were doing maintencance work and clearing the area so heavy rains wouldn’t cause drainage backups.

“Any kind of commercial, industrial, residential development you have to abide by the regulations. there is a whole series of them,” says retired consulting ecologist, Nigel Morris.

Florida Fish and Wildlife officials say, gopher tortoises are supposed to be relocated before any land clearing or development can take place.  But public works officials say, they didn’t know there were nests here.  They have stopped the job and removed their eqitment.  They are alos bring in an environmentalist to survey the area for burrows.

“I know going forward this may help other gopher turtles… but it’s not helping the ones that are dying today,” Fields adds.

Sherri Fields of Punta Gorda, FL is a Hero. After cohabiting with an increasing number of gopher tortoises and their burrow, she was horrified to discover city works destroying these tortoises’ peaceful habitat, even if it was unintended.This woman took the ‘see something, say something’ philosophy we tout so often these days,and used it to protect her non human neighbors. While she sadly points out that it will not save those whose burrows have already been affected, she has done much to bring attention to the innocent, state protected, bystanders being harmed by this clean up attempt. Garnering media attention and alerting the city, she’s most definitely on the tortoise ‘nice’ list for her efforts. To that I give Sherri a high five and hope that we all take a tip from her actions, keeping an eye out for all our shelled friends… in and out of the water. 

Read the article below and click the source to view the news video of Sherri and her neighborhood tortoises in action. 

(Source: WINK News Now)

PUNTA GORDA, Fl. – Sherri Fileds has lived in this neighborhood for 20 years.  One thing she loves, sharing the property with the burrowing wildlife.

“These turtles have taken over the end of this creek bank and there are a lot of turtles here and this has been their safety zone for 20 years,” she says.

It’s why she was so upset Monday when she saw the place these state protcted tortoises live torn up.

“Look at how they left this…. I mean this looks like a war zone here… this area didn’t look this bad when hurricane Charley came through,” she adds.

County Public Worls crews say they were doing maintencance work and clearing the area so heavy rains wouldn’t cause drainage backups.

“Any kind of commercial, industrial, residential development you have to abide by the regulations. there is a whole series of them,” says retired consulting ecologist, Nigel Morris.

Florida Fish and Wildlife officials say, gopher tortoises are supposed to be relocated before any land clearing or development can take place.  But public works officials say, they didn’t know there were nests here.  They have stopped the job and removed their eqitment.  They are alos bring in an environmentalist to survey the area for burrows.

“I know going forward this may help other gopher turtles… but it’s not helping the ones that are dying today,” Fields adds.

Sherri Fields of Punta Gorda, FL is a Hero. After cohabiting with an increasing number of gopher tortoises and their burrow, she was horrified to discover city works destroying these tortoises’ peaceful habitat, even if it was unintended.This woman took the ‘see something, say something’ philosophy we tout so often these days,and used it to protect her non human neighbors. While she sadly points out that it will not save those whose burrows have already been affected, she has done much to bring attention to the innocent, state protected, bystanders being harmed by this clean up attempt. Garnering media attention and alerting the city, she’s most definitely on the tortoise ‘nice’ list for her efforts. To that I give Sherri a high five and hope that we all take a tip from her actions, keeping an eye out for all our shelled friends… in and out of the water. 

Read the article below and click the source to view the news video of Sherri and her neighborhood tortoises in action. 

(Source: WINK News Now)

PUNTA GORDA, Fl. – Sherri Fileds has lived in this neighborhood for 20 years.  One thing she loves, sharing the property with the burrowing wildlife.

“These turtles have taken over the end of this creek bank and there are a lot of turtles here and this has been their safety zone for 20 years,” she says.

It’s why she was so upset Monday when she saw the place these state protcted tortoises live torn up.

“Look at how they left this…. I mean this looks like a war zone here… this area didn’t look this bad when hurricane Charley came through,” she adds.

County Public Worls crews say they were doing maintencance work and clearing the area so heavy rains wouldn’t cause drainage backups.

“Any kind of commercial, industrial, residential development you have to abide by the regulations. there is a whole series of them,” says retired consulting ecologist, Nigel Morris.

Florida Fish and Wildlife officials say, gopher tortoises are supposed to be relocated before any land clearing or development can take place.  But public works officials say, they didn’t know there were nests here.  They have stopped the job and removed their eqitment.  They are alos bring in an environmentalist to survey the area for burrows.

“I know going forward this may help other gopher turtles… but it’s not helping the ones that are dying today,” Fields adds.

Frankie’s Tortoise Tales teach us about the ‘mythical sulcata ram.’ I hear @sammyKaep7 is pretty good. @Kaepernick7, Sammy ever try a sack?

Frankie Tortoise Tales: The Mythical Ram

Frankie’s Year of The Ram continues. 
I see a lot of discussion about sulcata ramming. 
Both male and female sulcata ram.  When they want to.  Seen it.
Keepers with younger sulcata from hatchlings to a few years old really don’t notice ramming.  When a sulcata is young ramming looks like hiding and sounds like hissing.
As a sulcata get’s older things happen and a sulcata owner will wonder, “Did that sulcata just ram me?” or “Did the sulcata just give me a love-tap?”  For the medium sized sulcata a ram is more like a bump or a forward jump.  Owners think, “Oh, I just scared him.”
When a sulcata gets big….well there is no mistaking when a big sulcata rams.
Never stand in front of a big sulcata when it rams.  Just don’t.
There are signs.  Indicators.  Big White Flags.  Don’t ignore them. 
And never, NEVER, take the bucket away.

Read more stories from Frankie and his humans at Frankie’s blog. Its worth more than one read and you’ll definitely get a laugh.

Frankie’s Tortoise Tales teach us about the ‘mythical sulcata ram.’ I hear @sammyKaep7 is pretty good. @Kaepernick7, Sammy ever try a sack?

Frankie Tortoise Tales: The Mythical Ram

Frankie’s Year of The Ram continues. 
I see a lot of discussion about sulcata ramming. 
Both male and female sulcata ram.  When they want to.  Seen it.
Keepers with younger sulcata from hatchlings to a few years old really don’t notice ramming.  When a sulcata is young ramming looks like hiding and sounds like hissing.
As a sulcata get’s older things happen and a sulcata owner will wonder, “Did that sulcata just ram me?” or “Did the sulcata just give me a love-tap?”  For the medium sized sulcata a ram is more like a bump or a forward jump.  Owners think, “Oh, I just scared him.”
When a sulcata gets big….well there is no mistaking when a big sulcata rams.
Never stand in front of a big sulcata when it rams.  Just don’t.
There are signs.  Indicators.  Big White Flags.  Don’t ignore them. 
And never, NEVER, take the bucket away.

Read more stories from Frankie and his humans at Frankie’s blog. Its worth more than one read and you’ll definitely get a laugh.

Dad-of-one spends FIVE HOURS a day taking his pet tortoise Maximus for a walk… but his top speed is just 1mph 

(Source The Dailymail.co.uk)

Headline should really be: Owner of Maximus the 4 year old Sulcata, expemplifies real commitment to raising his shell friend to be happy and healthy. 

Rob has had Maximus since he was a hatchling, able to fit in his hand. Now at 4 years old and about 27 pounds, the duo go for 5 hour walks every day to ensure maximus gets quality sunlight (much stronger than any suplemental light we can have indoors) and vital to his proper growth.  

According to the article, “Chunky Maximus eats about 33 kilograms of lettuce every week and weighs 12 kilograms as his regime keeps him fit and strong.” Thats a little over 72 pounds a week! BTW, Daily Mail, he doesn’t look too chunky to me he seems just about right. 

The lifespan of a sulcata tortoise is about 120 years, if provided proper care.

“Rob will be hoping that Maximus’ celebrity status stays with him in future because despite Maximus’s popularity with family members, they will not be the ones who inherit him.

Rob said: ‘When I go he’ll have at least two thirds of his life to go – my family love him to bits but there’s no way I’d leave him with them.

‘I’d be hoping to get him into a zoo or sanctuary – somewhere where there’s plenty of salad to get stuck in to.’”

Check out more pictures, the rest of the article, and some footage of Rob and Maximus on the go at  The Dailymail.co.uk

Dad-of-one spends FIVE HOURS a day taking his pet tortoise Maximus for a walk… but his top speed is just 1mph 

(Source The Dailymail.co.uk)

Headline should really be: Owner of Maximus the 4 year old Sulcata, expemplifies real commitment to raising his shell friend to be happy and healthy. 

Rob has had Maximus since he was a hatchling, able to fit in his hand. Now at 4 years old and about 27 pounds, the duo go for 5 hour walks every day to ensure maximus gets quality sunlight (much stronger than any suplemental light we can have indoors) and vital to his proper growth.  

According to the article, “Chunky Maximus eats about 33 kilograms of lettuce every week and weighs 12 kilograms as his regime keeps him fit and strong.” Thats a little over 72 pounds a week! BTW, Daily Mail, he doesn’t look too chunky to me he seems just about right. 

The lifespan of a sulcata tortoise is about 120 years, if provided proper care.

“Rob will be hoping that Maximus’ celebrity status stays with him in future because despite Maximus’s popularity with family members, they will not be the ones who inherit him.

Rob said: ‘When I go he’ll have at least two thirds of his life to go – my family love him to bits but there’s no way I’d leave him with them.

‘I’d be hoping to get him into a zoo or sanctuary – somewhere where there’s plenty of salad to get stuck in to.’”

Check out more pictures, the rest of the article, and some footage of Rob and Maximus on the go at  The Dailymail.co.uk