Tortoise sprouts from the ground, mom wonders if she’s crying. 

We had an exceptionally hot day last week, for october in MA. Zoya decided to cool off by digging herself completely under some plants in the garden then sprouting up like a flower. A butterfly came along and befriended her, perching on her head, nose, and the plants around her. After reading this I couldn’t help but wonder, Is Zoya Crying?!

Tortoise sprouts from the ground, mom wonders if she’s crying. 

We had an exceptionally hot day last week, for october in MA. Zoya decided to cool off by digging herself completely under some plants in the garden then sprouting up like a flower. A butterfly came along and befriended her, perching on her head, nose, and the plants around her. After reading this I couldn’t help but wonder, Is Zoya Crying?!

Tortoise sprouts from the ground, mom wonders if she’s crying. 

We had an exceptionally hot day last week, for october in MA. Zoya decided to cool off by digging herself completely under some plants in the garden then sprouting up like a flower. A butterfly came along and befriended her, perching on her head, nose, and the plants around her. After reading this I couldn’t help but wonder, Is Zoya Crying?!

This ‘Terrapin Carolina’ (aka Eastern Box Turtle) is giving humans a sad side eye. This after it read a recent study indicating that it is one of 59 species of american turtles whose habitats are being threatened by climate change. 

(Source: phys.org)

A new study that reconstructs the effects of past climatic changes on 59 species of North American turtles finds that the centers of the turtles’ ranges shifted an average of 45 miles for each degree of warming or cooling. While some species were able to find widespread suitable climate, other species, many of which today are endangered, were left with only minimal habitat.

Species in temperate forests and grasslands, deserts, and lake systems, primarily in the Central and Eastern US, were more affected by climate change than species occurring along the Pacific Coast, in the mountain highlands of the Western US and Mexico, and in the tropics, according to the study published today in the journal PLOS ONE.

The study integrates data from more than 300 published studies on turtle physiology, genetics, and fossils with new models of species’ response to climate-change cycles over the last 320 millennia to draw its conclusions. During this timeframe, Earth passed through three glacial-interglacial cycles and significant variation in temperature.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-10-climate-threatens-northern-american-turtle.html#jCp

This ‘Terrapin Carolina’ (aka Eastern Box Turtle) is giving humans a sad side eye. This after it read a recent study indicating that it is one of 59 species of american turtles whose habitats are being threatened by climate change. 

(Source: phys.org)

A new study that reconstructs the effects of past climatic changes on 59 species of North American turtles finds that the centers of the turtles’ ranges shifted an average of 45 miles for each degree of warming or cooling. While some species were able to find widespread suitable climate, other species, many of which today are endangered, were left with only minimal habitat.

Species in temperate forests and grasslands, deserts, and lake systems, primarily in the Central and Eastern US, were more affected by climate change than species occurring along the Pacific Coast, in the mountain highlands of the Western US and Mexico, and in the tropics, according to the study published today in the journal PLOS ONE.

The study integrates data from more than 300 published studies on turtle physiology, genetics, and fossils with new models of species’ response to climate-change cycles over the last 320 millennia to draw its conclusions. During this timeframe, Earth passed through three glacial-interglacial cycles and significant variation in temperature.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-10-climate-threatens-northern-american-turtle.html#jCp

Thought I’d start the week with another incredible, inspirational, and dare I say stylish, happy ending for a sea turtle

(via Brevard Times)

COCOA BEACH, Florida — A surfer came to the rescue of a loggerhead sea turtle that was tangled in fishing lines just south of the Cocoa Beach Pier this afternoon.

The turtle’s flippers were so entangled that it could be seen gasping for air from the ocean’s surface as it struggled to free itself from the mono-filament.

Seeing the marine reptile in distress, a nearby surfer paddled over to help the sea turtle while risking a possible bite from the animal. Loggerhead sea turtles have a bite force so powerful, that they can easily tear through a conch shell – a mainstay of the turtle’s diet.

After a few minutes, the surfer had completely untangled the sea turtle and it swam away. Having done his good deed for the day, the surfer then just casually caught the next incoming wave.

Loggerhead sea turtles are listed as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act.

Thought I’d start the week with another incredible, inspirational, and dare I say stylish, happy ending for a sea turtle

(via Brevard Times)

COCOA BEACH, Florida — A surfer came to the rescue of a loggerhead sea turtle that was tangled in fishing lines just south of the Cocoa Beach Pier this afternoon.

The turtle’s flippers were so entangled that it could be seen gasping for air from the ocean’s surface as it struggled to free itself from the mono-filament.

Seeing the marine reptile in distress, a nearby surfer paddled over to help the sea turtle while risking a possible bite from the animal. Loggerhead sea turtles have a bite force so powerful, that they can easily tear through a conch shell – a mainstay of the turtle’s diet.

After a few minutes, the surfer had completely untangled the sea turtle and it swam away. Having done his good deed for the day, the surfer then just casually caught the next incoming wave.

Loggerhead sea turtles are listed as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act.