Thursday getting you down? Take a few minutes and watch Lilo swim her way back to health via the Texas A&M Turtle Facility’s  Turtle Cam!  This is my kinda meditation. 

(Source: houstonchronicle.com)

Welcome Lilo to Texas A&M University at Galveston’s“Turtle Cam,” which monitors the small circular tank where Lilo glides around, occasionally eating shrimp and crab, for 24 hours a day. On Tuesday afternoon, 31 people were watching the stream, currently housed on Galveston.com, but soon to move over to the A&M’s website, as well. The stream has had more than 12,000 viewers.

A&M rehabilitates the turtles in the tanks like the one featured on the live stream. The turtles, most of which have spent time healing from illness or injuries at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Sea Turtle Facility in Galveston, a sort of sea turtle hospital, are put in the tanks and allowed to swim around until they regain their strength and grow less used to humans.

“We’re trying to get them back to their natural state where they’re fearful of people, or at least cognizant that this isn’t normal,” said Dr. Kimberly Reich, marine research facility manager at A&M

Lilo, and another small turtle nicknamed Stitch, were washed ashore with this summer’s endless wave of seaweed. The two spent about a month at the sea turtle facility before moving over to A&M’s tanks late last week. They’ll stay there through the winter, Reich said.

In 2012, the Turtle Cam hosted its first star: Milagro, a turtle, who had suffered a cracked carapace, damaged lungs, a missing right front flipper and portion of his shell. The turtle, who had been found by a couple of fishermen, also had pneumonia.

A growing online following watched as a recovering Milagro swam around his tank. He was release the day after Memorial Day.

Giant fisit bump to the ultra observant Sea Turtle Patrol volunteer, Maggie Probst! She noticed and followed some ‘odd looking tracks’ then finding this sadface sea turtle under a building and clearly in distress. Once found, Probst and other volunteers were able to coax her back into the Gulf of Mexico, securing a happy ending for this beautiful shell. 

(Full article:Herald Tribune )

Sea Turtle Patrol volunteer Maggie Probst discovered errant turtle tracks on the Hermitage Artist Retreat property at 6660 Manasota Key Road.

Probst called about the “unusual crawl,” said Sea Patrol volunteer Zoe Bass.

“There were tracks all around the campus,” said Sharyn Lonsdale, executive assistant at the retreat.

Bass followed the meandering tracks.

“I just happened to look under the office building and there she was,” Bass said.

“She was just exhausted,” Lonsdale said. “She was not moving but she was breathing.”

Bass said the turtle may have become frightened and disoriented during the night while looking for a place to nest.

Giant fisit bump to the ultra observant Sea Turtle Patrol volunteer, Maggie Probst! She noticed and followed some ‘odd looking tracks’ then finding this sadface sea turtle under a building and clearly in distress. Once found, Probst and other volunteers were able to coax her back into the Gulf of Mexico, securing a happy ending for this beautiful shell. 

(Full article:Herald Tribune )

Sea Turtle Patrol volunteer Maggie Probst discovered errant turtle tracks on the Hermitage Artist Retreat property at 6660 Manasota Key Road.

Probst called about the “unusual crawl,” said Sea Patrol volunteer Zoe Bass.

“There were tracks all around the campus,” said Sharyn Lonsdale, executive assistant at the retreat.

Bass followed the meandering tracks.

“I just happened to look under the office building and there she was,” Bass said.

“She was just exhausted,” Lonsdale said. “She was not moving but she was breathing.”

Bass said the turtle may have become frightened and disoriented during the night while looking for a place to nest.

Glad to see this step in the right direction.

(Source: Ticotimes.net )

As of Monday, all shrimp boats operating in Central America and the Dominican Republic must use turtle excluder devices, or TEDs, which allow a captured sea turtle to escape when caught in a fisherman’s net.

A special committee at the Central American Integration System (SICA) decreed the mandatory measure in May, aimed at helping reduce the number of bycatch caught in shrimp nets.

Boat owners who fail to use TEDs could face fines and have their commercial fishing licenses suspended or revoked, according to regulations adopted by SICA member countries.

Antonio Porras, technical director at the Costa Rican Fisheries Institute, said that Costa Rica already had adopted similar measures in the late 1990s. He added that crews who fail to use TEDs should face charges before a criminal court.

Pictured: In February some 280 turtles were found dead in Costa Rica’s southern Pacific.

Glad to see this step in the right direction.

(Source: Ticotimes.net )

As of Monday, all shrimp boats operating in Central America and the Dominican Republic must use turtle excluder devices, or TEDs, which allow a captured sea turtle to escape when caught in a fisherman’s net.

A special committee at the Central American Integration System (SICA) decreed the mandatory measure in May, aimed at helping reduce the number of bycatch caught in shrimp nets.

Boat owners who fail to use TEDs could face fines and have their commercial fishing licenses suspended or revoked, according to regulations adopted by SICA member countries.

Antonio Porras, technical director at the Costa Rican Fisheries Institute, said that Costa Rica already had adopted similar measures in the late 1990s. He added that crews who fail to use TEDs should face charges before a criminal court.

Pictured: In February some 280 turtles were found dead in Costa Rica’s southern Pacific.

Take a moment to sign the petition calling for justice for Jairo Sandoval, murdered by poachers for protecting sea turtles. Do not let Sandoval’s death be in vain. Do not let these poachers destroy what Sandoval and so many others have dedicated their lives to. 

Sign the petition demanding action from the Costa Rican government. Sea turtles, conservationists, and citizens alike need your help. 

Take a moment to sign the petition calling for justice for Jairo Sandoval, murdered by poachers for protecting sea turtles. Do not let Sandoval’s death be in vain. Do not let these poachers destroy what Sandoval and so many others have dedicated their lives to. 

Sign the petition demanding action from the Costa Rican government. Sea turtles, conservationists, and citizens alike need your help.