(Via Susannah Bryan & The Sun Sentinal

Bet you’ve NEVER seen anything like this! Tortoise rehab uses unique tools- electro acupuncture – and its working!  

This 10-year-old gopher tortoise, a threatened species of tortoise, was severely injured after she was hit by a car. She was spotted by a volunteer, struggling on the side of the road with a cracked shell dragging her back legs behind her. She was brought in to the South Florida Wildlife Center in Ft. Lauderdale where vets were able to keep her alive but her back legs she had clear nerve damage that decreased her mobility and caused her pain.

The staff at the center did not give up hope, however, instead, they decided to employ an unusual technique –  electro-acupuncture. The treatment combines electric current and acupuncture to ease pain and increase mobility. It is used more frequently on dogs, cats, horses, and humans, not on tortoises.

“She’s a little fidgety at first, but a couple minutes into it, she relaxes,” said Dr. Carolina Medina, a veterinary acupuncturist. “Acupuncture releases natural hormones from your body that make you feel good and decrease pain, so most patients feel pretty relaxed.

image

Lucky for this gal, the treatment seems to be working. It will likely be 6 more months before she can be released back but the staff is confident it will happen. Returning her to her home, health and with strong back legs, will not only mean good things for her but allow her to borrow and lay eggs, a good thing for her entire species.

Thursday getting you down? Take a few minutes and watch Lilo swim her way back to health via the Texas A&M Turtle Facility’s  Turtle Cam!  This is my kinda meditation. 

(Source: houstonchronicle.com)

Welcome Lilo to Texas A&M University at Galveston’s“Turtle Cam,” which monitors the small circular tank where Lilo glides around, occasionally eating shrimp and crab, for 24 hours a day. On Tuesday afternoon, 31 people were watching the stream, currently housed on Galveston.com, but soon to move over to the A&M’s website, as well. The stream has had more than 12,000 viewers.

A&M rehabilitates the turtles in the tanks like the one featured on the live stream. The turtles, most of which have spent time healing from illness or injuries at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Sea Turtle Facility in Galveston, a sort of sea turtle hospital, are put in the tanks and allowed to swim around until they regain their strength and grow less used to humans.

“We’re trying to get them back to their natural state where they’re fearful of people, or at least cognizant that this isn’t normal,” said Dr. Kimberly Reich, marine research facility manager at A&M

Lilo, and another small turtle nicknamed Stitch, were washed ashore with this summer’s endless wave of seaweed. The two spent about a month at the sea turtle facility before moving over to A&M’s tanks late last week. They’ll stay there through the winter, Reich said.

In 2012, the Turtle Cam hosted its first star: Milagro, a turtle, who had suffered a cracked carapace, damaged lungs, a missing right front flipper and portion of his shell. The turtle, who had been found by a couple of fishermen, also had pneumonia.

A growing online following watched as a recovering Milagro swam around his tank. He was release the day after Memorial Day.

@NEAQ sees sea turtle stranding season activity pick up

Tuesday night and Wednesday morning, 12 endangered sea turtles were found on the beaches of Cape Cod by some dedicated (and likely very cold) Mass Audubon Sanctuary WellFleet volunteers. All the turtles have been transported to the New England Aquarium’s Animal Care Center in Quincy, MA, joining the 4 rescued since Nov 5th, to be slowly warmed and rehabilitated. 13 of the turtles being rehabbed at the facility are rare juvenile Kemp’s Ridley sea turtles.

More From the NEAQ Blog
The two- to ten-pound sea turtles with black shells were collected by staff and volunteers with the Massachusetts Audubon Sanctuary at Wellfleet Bay who walked the frigid beaches looking for the near motionless marine reptiles in the debris at the high tide line. With strong westerly winds creating steady wave activity, the floating turtles left the 50-something degree water to more dangerous conditions on the beach with early morning air temperatures in the 20’s. Getting to the turtles in a timely manner is important to avoid a further drop in body temperature.

November and December is the sea turtle stranding season on Cape Cod as juvenile sea turtles that have migrated there for the summer to feed on crabs fail to return south to warmer waters. All of these strandings occur on the north side of the huge peninsula in Cape Cod Bay. The bay is surrounded by land on three sides with its only opening to the north, which is instinctively counter-intuitive.

In the area? VOLUNTEER! 
If you’re on the Cape, volunteers are needed at Mass Audubon.
Volunteer to walk the beaches! If you can volunteer a couple of hours a week, day or night, you could help save the life of a sea turtle by helping to get it off the beach before it freezes. Does walking beaches in 30 to 40 mph winds with air temperatures hovering around 30 degrees seem like fun? Well, we have an opportunity for you! How about helping us at 2 am? We’re not kidding, we’re out there.

Volunteer to be a driver! All the live sea turtles are transported to the New England Aquarium Rescue Center in Quincy. We sometimes need to make two or three trips a day. To become a volunteer, please contact volunteer coordinator Diane Silverstein by calling, 508-349-2615. 

@LittleRESq : An inspiring story of turtle/tortoise love and a call to action for all of us! 

@LittleRESQ is awe inspiring in many ways. Because of the incredible work they’ve done to rehabilitate Red Eared Sliders and other turtles, educating the public on the impact of poor care through their awesome spokes turtle Audrey R Slider, and because the hub of LittleRESq is run by Marc Ouellette in his 2 bedroom apartment.

Thats right, a 2 bedroom apartment. Started in 2008, out of a love of turtles from childhood, Ouellette and a few hard working volunteers run this fantastic rescue.  Increasing number of needy turtles, tortoises, and other reptiles continue to increase the numbers of animals being rehabilitated by LittleRESq. Their space is limited and resources are slim, yet the work they do continues to be incredibly impactful for those animals fallen victim to poor care and abuse. 

Take a minute to read the article from the Torontoist and visit http://www.littleresq.net/  to learn more about the amazing work being done. The rescue is in need of a larger space and that costs money. Every penny helps. Donate if you can, and spread the word! 

(Source: Torontoist)

Ouellette has loved turtles all his life. (His first one, Apollo, is about to turn 24, which is middle aged by turtle standards.) He started Little RES Q in 2008 after realizing there was a need. He says that red-eared sliders are abandoned and released into the wild with alarming frequency.

“People buy this little toonie-sized turtle at the pet store for $20, and it’s like, ‘OK, I can put that in a little tank,’ but within three years, the females get up to two or three pounds, the boys weigh about a pound” he says. “Then you need a bigger tank and filtration system and that costs so many hundreds of dollars…It gets too expensive, and then they don’t realize turtles can live up to 50 years.”

The problem with releasing pet sliders into the wild isn’t that they can’t fend for themselves. It’s that Ontario’s native turtles can’t fend them off. Sliders have an indigenous territory that stretches from Ohio to Mexico, but they’re hardy and reproduce quickly. This makes them a pet turtle of choice, but it has also earned them a place on the World Conservation Union’s list of the world’s 100 most invasive species.

“They’re generalists, so they can adapt to our climate,” Ouellette says. “Then, they’ll just muscle out our native turtles like the painted turtle…They turn feral and aggressive very quickly.”

Ouellette says that he doesn’t find new homes for his foster turtles very frequently, partially because there are already so many sliders in pet stores, and partially because he carefully screens potential adoptees.

“There have been people who want to take a turtle home and say, ‘Well, I’ll put it in a bucket and take care of it later,’” he says. “Well, no. You need to have a set up before you take it in. We don’t want to see that turtle coming back.”

Ouellette has recently started taking in other abandoned reptiles.

“Because we’ve turned into one of the more reputable rescues for reptiles in Toronto, we get recommended a lot,” he says. “So when people call a pet store or whatever and say, ‘I have a snake I need to get rid of,’ we’re usually the first one people call.”

Ouellette and his Little RES Q colleagues are trying to make sure that fewer turtles end up homeless by working on outreach and education. They’ve started publishing pamphlets in multiple languages, and are a regular feature at reptile shows.

“As much as I love what I do, if there came a time when I didn’t have to do this, that would be great,” he says. “It’s just a matter of education. People need to know what these turtles are like at their adult size. They need to know what a turtle needs and how big they get.”

He acknowledges that people probably won’t stop surrendering turtles in the near future, so he’s working on expanding his operation. He recently applied for registered charity status.

“Hopefully we can get a donated space, so I don’t have to do this all out of my home,” he says.

Photos courtesy of Little RES Q.

Article from The Torontoist

@LittleRESq : An inspiring story of turtle/tortoise love and a call to action for all of us! 

@LittleRESQ is awe inspiring in many ways. Because of the incredible work they’ve done to rehabilitate Red Eared Sliders and other turtles, educating the public on the impact of poor care through their awesome spokes turtle Audrey R Slider, and because the hub of LittleRESq is run by Marc Ouellette in his 2 bedroom apartment.

Thats right, a 2 bedroom apartment. Started in 2008, out of a love of turtles from childhood, Ouellette and a few hard working volunteers run this fantastic rescue.  Increasing number of needy turtles, tortoises, and other reptiles continue to increase the numbers of animals being rehabilitated by LittleRESq. Their space is limited and resources are slim, yet the work they do continues to be incredibly impactful for those animals fallen victim to poor care and abuse. 

Take a minute to read the article from the Torontoist and visit http://www.littleresq.net/  to learn more about the amazing work being done. The rescue is in need of a larger space and that costs money. Every penny helps. Donate if you can, and spread the word! 

(Source: Torontoist)

Ouellette has loved turtles all his life. (His first one, Apollo, is about to turn 24, which is middle aged by turtle standards.) He started Little RES Q in 2008 after realizing there was a need. He says that red-eared sliders are abandoned and released into the wild with alarming frequency.

“People buy this little toonie-sized turtle at the pet store for $20, and it’s like, ‘OK, I can put that in a little tank,’ but within three years, the females get up to two or three pounds, the boys weigh about a pound” he says. “Then you need a bigger tank and filtration system and that costs so many hundreds of dollars…It gets too expensive, and then they don’t realize turtles can live up to 50 years.”

The problem with releasing pet sliders into the wild isn’t that they can’t fend for themselves. It’s that Ontario’s native turtles can’t fend them off. Sliders have an indigenous territory that stretches from Ohio to Mexico, but they’re hardy and reproduce quickly. This makes them a pet turtle of choice, but it has also earned them a place on the World Conservation Union’s list of the world’s 100 most invasive species.

“They’re generalists, so they can adapt to our climate,” Ouellette says. “Then, they’ll just muscle out our native turtles like the painted turtle…They turn feral and aggressive very quickly.”

Ouellette says that he doesn’t find new homes for his foster turtles very frequently, partially because there are already so many sliders in pet stores, and partially because he carefully screens potential adoptees.

“There have been people who want to take a turtle home and say, ‘Well, I’ll put it in a bucket and take care of it later,’” he says. “Well, no. You need to have a set up before you take it in. We don’t want to see that turtle coming back.”

Ouellette has recently started taking in other abandoned reptiles.

“Because we’ve turned into one of the more reputable rescues for reptiles in Toronto, we get recommended a lot,” he says. “So when people call a pet store or whatever and say, ‘I have a snake I need to get rid of,’ we’re usually the first one people call.”

Ouellette and his Little RES Q colleagues are trying to make sure that fewer turtles end up homeless by working on outreach and education. They’ve started publishing pamphlets in multiple languages, and are a regular feature at reptile shows.

“As much as I love what I do, if there came a time when I didn’t have to do this, that would be great,” he says. “It’s just a matter of education. People need to know what these turtles are like at their adult size. They need to know what a turtle needs and how big they get.”

He acknowledges that people probably won’t stop surrendering turtles in the near future, so he’s working on expanding his operation. He recently applied for registered charity status.

“Hopefully we can get a donated space, so I don’t have to do this all out of my home,” he says.

Photos courtesy of Little RES Q.

Article from The Torontoist

@LittleRESq : An inspiring story of turtle/tortoise love and a call to action for all of us! 

@LittleRESQ is awe inspiring in many ways. Because of the incredible work they’ve done to rehabilitate Red Eared Sliders and other turtles, educating the public on the impact of poor care through their awesome spokes turtle Audrey R Slider, and because the hub of LittleRESq is run by Marc Ouellette in his 2 bedroom apartment.

Thats right, a 2 bedroom apartment. Started in 2008, out of a love of turtles from childhood, Ouellette and a few hard working volunteers run this fantastic rescue.  Increasing number of needy turtles, tortoises, and other reptiles continue to increase the numbers of animals being rehabilitated by LittleRESq. Their space is limited and resources are slim, yet the work they do continues to be incredibly impactful for those animals fallen victim to poor care and abuse. 

Take a minute to read the article from the Torontoist and visit http://www.littleresq.net/  to learn more about the amazing work being done. The rescue is in need of a larger space and that costs money. Every penny helps. Donate if you can, and spread the word! 

(Source: Torontoist)

Ouellette has loved turtles all his life. (His first one, Apollo, is about to turn 24, which is middle aged by turtle standards.) He started Little RES Q in 2008 after realizing there was a need. He says that red-eared sliders are abandoned and released into the wild with alarming frequency.

“People buy this little toonie-sized turtle at the pet store for $20, and it’s like, ‘OK, I can put that in a little tank,’ but within three years, the females get up to two or three pounds, the boys weigh about a pound” he says. “Then you need a bigger tank and filtration system and that costs so many hundreds of dollars…It gets too expensive, and then they don’t realize turtles can live up to 50 years.”

The problem with releasing pet sliders into the wild isn’t that they can’t fend for themselves. It’s that Ontario’s native turtles can’t fend them off. Sliders have an indigenous territory that stretches from Ohio to Mexico, but they’re hardy and reproduce quickly. This makes them a pet turtle of choice, but it has also earned them a place on the World Conservation Union’s list of the world’s 100 most invasive species.

“They’re generalists, so they can adapt to our climate,” Ouellette says. “Then, they’ll just muscle out our native turtles like the painted turtle…They turn feral and aggressive very quickly.”

Ouellette says that he doesn’t find new homes for his foster turtles very frequently, partially because there are already so many sliders in pet stores, and partially because he carefully screens potential adoptees.

“There have been people who want to take a turtle home and say, ‘Well, I’ll put it in a bucket and take care of it later,’” he says. “Well, no. You need to have a set up before you take it in. We don’t want to see that turtle coming back.”

Ouellette has recently started taking in other abandoned reptiles.

“Because we’ve turned into one of the more reputable rescues for reptiles in Toronto, we get recommended a lot,” he says. “So when people call a pet store or whatever and say, ‘I have a snake I need to get rid of,’ we’re usually the first one people call.”

Ouellette and his Little RES Q colleagues are trying to make sure that fewer turtles end up homeless by working on outreach and education. They’ve started publishing pamphlets in multiple languages, and are a regular feature at reptile shows.

“As much as I love what I do, if there came a time when I didn’t have to do this, that would be great,” he says. “It’s just a matter of education. People need to know what these turtles are like at their adult size. They need to know what a turtle needs and how big they get.”

He acknowledges that people probably won’t stop surrendering turtles in the near future, so he’s working on expanding his operation. He recently applied for registered charity status.

“Hopefully we can get a donated space, so I don’t have to do this all out of my home,” he says.

Photos courtesy of Little RES Q.

Article from The Torontoist

Black Friday Shell Edition Part 3 – The Health Care and Rehabilitation of Turtles and Tortoises 

This one is a gift for with a more direct benefit for your shelled friends and/or the aspiring turtle and tortoise rehabilitator in your life. 

The Health Care and Rehabilitation of Turtles and Tortoises was a long awaited release. Written from a hands on perspective suited for the rehabilitator, vet tech, and pet owner. The book has quality, up to date, information on everything from basic care & common health to rarer health issues and treatment options.

One of the best part of the book is its accessibility. It has all the technical info written for the pet owner that wants to provide the best care for their turtle or tortoise AND for those boning up to become a licensed rehabilitator. Plenty of pictures to make understanding easier and a large list of resources and further reading in the back!  NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR VETS CARE but definitely good for identifying issues before they develop. 

Definitely worth a purchase. Check it out here or on Amazon.com

Black Friday Shell Edition Part 3 – The Health Care and Rehabilitation of Turtles and Tortoises 

This one is a gift for with a more direct benefit for your shelled friends and/or the aspiring turtle and tortoise rehabilitator in your life. 

The Health Care and Rehabilitation of Turtles and Tortoises was a long awaited release. Written from a hands on perspective suited for the rehabilitator, vet tech, and pet owner. The book has quality, up to date, information on everything from basic care & common health to rarer health issues and treatment options.

One of the best part of the book is its accessibility. It has all the technical info written for the pet owner that wants to provide the best care for their turtle or tortoise AND for those boning up to become a licensed rehabilitator. Plenty of pictures to make understanding easier and a large list of resources and further reading in the back!  NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR VETS CARE but definitely good for identifying issues before they develop. 

Definitely worth a purchase. Check it out here or on Amazon.com

can my job be tickling turtles?! I have a resume and cover letter ready.. just tell me where to send it! 

Tickling turtles back to health

By Alice Roberts

A short ferry ride across Gladstone Harbour in central Queensland takes you to Quoin Island, a small privately owned piece of paradise. It’s home to the Quoin Island Turtle Rehabilitation Centre and part of the rehab includes plenty of tickles and massages that the turtles just love.

Read about this awesome place! doooo it! 

can my job be tickling turtles?! I have a resume and cover letter ready.. just tell me where to send it! 

Tickling turtles back to health

By Alice Roberts

A short ferry ride across Gladstone Harbour in central Queensland takes you to Quoin Island, a small privately owned piece of paradise. It’s home to the Quoin Island Turtle Rehabilitation Centre and part of the rehab includes plenty of tickles and massages that the turtles just love.

Read about this awesome place! doooo it!