typhlonectes:

Wood Turtles @ Seney National Wildlife Refuge , MI

by Andrea Martinson

This guy was found near M-2 pool not too long
ago. Wood turtles (Glyptemys insculpta) are the rarest of the three turtles species we have on
the Refuge. They are recognized by their sculpted-looking carapace (top
of the shell) and their yellowish-black plastron (underside of the
shell).

They tend to live in forested areas and river banks. It’s not a
picky eater, and enjoys snacking on leaves, berries, earthworms, snails,
insects, or even carrion. One way they eat earthworms is by repeatedly
stomping or slamming their shell into the ground. The vibrations make
the worms emerge from the soil, making the wood turtle’s job much
easier.

(via: Seney National Wildlife Refuge )

turtleconservancy:

If you’re spending time outside this weekend in the North East make sure to keep an eye out for Wood Turtles (Glyptemys insculpta)! Wood Turtles are a beautiful and charismatic species classified as Endangered by the IUCN. They have suffered greatly from habitat loss and degradation, as well as collection for the illegal pet trade. When encountering a wild turtle it is best to leave them alone and allow them to get to their destination safely. Happy Friday!

rhamphotheca:

Team Tracks Threatened Tortoises at Yuma Proving Grounds (AZ)

by Mark Schauer, The (YPG) Outpost

With November here, the Yuma Proving Ground’s population of Sonoran Desert Tortoises are preparing for brumation, the reptilian equivalent to hibernation. 

Humans responsible for their stewardship, however, are celebrating a year of discovery about the desert creatures.

“We learned more this season about tortoises in this region than has ever been known,” said Daniel Steward, YPG wildlife biologist.

To facilitate YPG’s important mission while at the same time conserving the proving ground’s wildlife population, wildlife biologists have actively sought to determine where populations of desert tortoises live, searching for the creatures in plots of land most likely to have them present. Steward says that, unlike the Mojave Tortoise, which isn’t found at YPG, Sonoran Tortoises prefer rocky areas with lots of shelter sites…

(read more: Yuma Sun)

rhamphotheca:

Today, after coming back from lunch, I saw a big male Three-toed Box Turtle (Terrapene c. triunguis) out in the park (Houston, TX), and I gave him a couple of cherry tomatoes. He was very grateful. :3

Oh man, you are his FAVORITE, Seeing him strut carrying that in his mouth is priceless. 

rhamphotheca:

Today, after coming back from lunch, I saw a big male Three-toed Box Turtle (Terrapene c. triunguis) out in the park (Houston, TX), and I gave him a couple of cherry tomatoes. He was very grateful. :3

Oh man, you are his FAVORITE, Seeing him strut carrying that in his mouth is priceless. 

rhamphotheca:

Today, after coming back from lunch, I saw a big male Three-toed Box Turtle (Terrapene c. triunguis) out in the park (Houston, TX), and I gave him a couple of cherry tomatoes. He was very grateful. :3

Oh man, you are his FAVORITE, Seeing him strut carrying that in his mouth is priceless. 

rhamphotheca:

Today, after coming back from lunch, I saw a big male Three-toed Box Turtle (Terrapene c. triunguis) out in the park (Houston, TX), and I gave him a couple of cherry tomatoes. He was very grateful. :3

Oh man, you are his FAVORITE, Seeing him strut carrying that in his mouth is priceless. 

rhamphotheca:

Today, after coming back from lunch, I saw a big male Three-toed Box Turtle (Terrapene c. triunguis) out in the park (Houston, TX), and I gave him a couple of cherry tomatoes. He was very grateful. :3

Oh man, you are his FAVORITE, Seeing him strut carrying that in his mouth is priceless. 

rhamphotheca:

Why does the terrapin cross the runway?

It was the summer of 2011, and we had 20 female diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) crawling across the taxiways and runway at John F. Kennedy International Airport in Queens, N.Y.

Airport operations staff scrambled to pick them all up. Aircraft pilots discussed the terrapins on the radio with the air traffic control tower.

And just when we would try to reopen the runway, another terrapin would be spotted. The 10-15 minutes felt like hours. Sure, it was a serious issue, but watching the terrapins cross oblivious to the vehicles and aircraft was also amusing…

(read more: US Fish & Wildlife Service – NE)

Photo by Dave Fitzpatrick/Flickr

rhamphotheca:

Why does the terrapin cross the runway?

It was the summer of 2011, and we had 20 female diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) crawling across the taxiways and runway at John F. Kennedy International Airport in Queens, N.Y.

Airport operations staff scrambled to pick them all up. Aircraft pilots discussed the terrapins on the radio with the air traffic control tower.

And just when we would try to reopen the runway, another terrapin would be spotted. The 10-15 minutes felt like hours. Sure, it was a serious issue, but watching the terrapins cross oblivious to the vehicles and aircraft was also amusing…

(read more: US Fish & Wildlife Service – NE)

Photo by Dave Fitzpatrick/Flickr

rhamphotheca:

Why does the terrapin cross the runway?

It was the summer of 2011, and we had 20 female diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) crawling across the taxiways and runway at John F. Kennedy International Airport in Queens, N.Y.

Airport operations staff scrambled to pick them all up. Aircraft pilots discussed the terrapins on the radio with the air traffic control tower.

And just when we would try to reopen the runway, another terrapin would be spotted. The 10-15 minutes felt like hours. Sure, it was a serious issue, but watching the terrapins cross oblivious to the vehicles and aircraft was also amusing…

(read more: US Fish & Wildlife Service – NE)

Photo by Dave Fitzpatrick/Flickr

rhamphotheca:

Why does the terrapin cross the runway?

It was the summer of 2011, and we had 20 female diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) crawling across the taxiways and runway at John F. Kennedy International Airport in Queens, N.Y.

Airport operations staff scrambled to pick them all up. Aircraft pilots discussed the terrapins on the radio with the air traffic control tower.

And just when we would try to reopen the runway, another terrapin would be spotted. The 10-15 minutes felt like hours. Sure, it was a serious issue, but watching the terrapins cross oblivious to the vehicles and aircraft was also amusing…

(read more: US Fish & Wildlife Service – NE)

Photo by Dave Fitzpatrick/Flickr

rhamphotheca:

Why does the terrapin cross the runway?

It was the summer of 2011, and we had 20 female diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) crawling across the taxiways and runway at John F. Kennedy International Airport in Queens, N.Y.

Airport operations staff scrambled to pick them all up. Aircraft pilots discussed the terrapins on the radio with the air traffic control tower.

And just when we would try to reopen the runway, another terrapin would be spotted. The 10-15 minutes felt like hours. Sure, it was a serious issue, but watching the terrapins cross oblivious to the vehicles and aircraft was also amusing…

(read more: US Fish & Wildlife Service – NE)

Photo by Dave Fitzpatrick/Flickr

astronomy-to-zoology:

Bolson Tortoise (Gopherus flavomarginatus)

Also known as the Mexican giant tortoise or the Yellow-margined tortoise, the Bolson tortoise is a large species of gopher tortoise that is native to a region of the Chihuahuan Desert in north-central Mexico. Like other tortoises Bolson tortoises are herbivores and will feed on a variety of grasses, shrubs and herbs. They will dig small burrows and use them as refuge from predators and weather. These burrows are usually constructed in social aggregations and clusters can reveal the social structures of individuals.

Bolson tortoises are currently listed as vulnerable and their populations are in decline. This is due in part to over-collection for food and the pet trade and habitat destruction. 

Phylogeny

Animalia-Chordata-Reptilia-Testudines-Cryptodira-Testudinoidea-Testudinidae-Gopherus-G.flavomarginatus

Images :Mbtrap and Sandy Arbogast

astronomy-to-zoology:

Bolson Tortoise (Gopherus flavomarginatus)

Also known as the Mexican giant tortoise or the Yellow-margined tortoise, the Bolson tortoise is a large species of gopher tortoise that is native to a region of the Chihuahuan Desert in north-central Mexico. Like other tortoises Bolson tortoises are herbivores and will feed on a variety of grasses, shrubs and herbs. They will dig small burrows and use them as refuge from predators and weather. These burrows are usually constructed in social aggregations and clusters can reveal the social structures of individuals.

Bolson tortoises are currently listed as vulnerable and their populations are in decline. This is due in part to over-collection for food and the pet trade and habitat destruction. 

Phylogeny

Animalia-Chordata-Reptilia-Testudines-Cryptodira-Testudinoidea-Testudinidae-Gopherus-G.flavomarginatus

Images :Mbtrap and Sandy Arbogast

astronomy-to-zoology:

Bolson Tortoise (Gopherus flavomarginatus)

Also known as the Mexican giant tortoise or the Yellow-margined tortoise, the Bolson tortoise is a large species of gopher tortoise that is native to a region of the Chihuahuan Desert in north-central Mexico. Like other tortoises Bolson tortoises are herbivores and will feed on a variety of grasses, shrubs and herbs. They will dig small burrows and use them as refuge from predators and weather. These burrows are usually constructed in social aggregations and clusters can reveal the social structures of individuals.

Bolson tortoises are currently listed as vulnerable and their populations are in decline. This is due in part to over-collection for food and the pet trade and habitat destruction. 

Phylogeny

Animalia-Chordata-Reptilia-Testudines-Cryptodira-Testudinoidea-Testudinidae-Gopherus-G.flavomarginatus

Images :Mbtrap and Sandy Arbogast