Live in Nevada? Now you can show your support for the incredible desert tortoise with your very own Respect & Protect license plate! 

(Via Reptile Magazine)

The special Nevada desert tortoise license plate is now available for order. Proceeds from the sale will benefit conservation efforts of the species.

Mojave Max was a desert tortoise who lived at the Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area in Nevada. In addition to helping educate children of Nevada, he was the representative of the Clark County Desert Conservation Program, and the West Coast’s answer to Pennsylvania’s Punxsutawney Phil, the sometimes unreliable mammalian weather protector.

The special plate costs just $62 for a standard plate and $97 for a personalized plate, with $25 of that going to support desert conservation measures. More information is available on the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles website.

Don’t let the lives of these tortoises get lost in the red tape and political plays surrounding this issue. Euthanasia is still on the table, media coverage continues to be confusing, read more and spread the word!

(Message & Image From The American Tortoise Rescue’s Facebook Page)

If you live in Nevada only, you can adopt. Just like California it is against the law to move a desert tortoise out of state. Here’s the news according to Herp Digest: All numbers to Desert Tortoise Conservation Center (DTCC) have been disconnected – (my note – no surprise there – don’t want any more nasty media calls). It doesn’t seem they are adopting out any tortoises at the moment, though tortoises are being accepted, according to the website at The Animal Foundation (formerly Lied Animal Shelter) 655 N. Mojave Road, Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702) 384-3333. According to a recent article posted on DTCC website, this group seems to be just turning them over to DTCC. So if you are in Nevada, call the Foundation if you have a tortoise to give up or just to inquire about adopting one. It’s still a mess but maybe you can save a tortoise from euthanasia.

Don’t let the lives of these tortoises get lost in the red tape and political plays surrounding this issue. Euthanasia is still on the table, media coverage continues to be confusing, read more and spread the word!

(Message & Image From The American Tortoise Rescue’s Facebook Page)

If you live in Nevada only, you can adopt. Just like California it is against the law to move a desert tortoise out of state. Here’s the news according to Herp Digest: All numbers to Desert Tortoise Conservation Center (DTCC) have been disconnected – (my note – no surprise there – don’t want any more nasty media calls). It doesn’t seem they are adopting out any tortoises at the moment, though tortoises are being accepted, according to the website at The Animal Foundation (formerly Lied Animal Shelter) 655 N. Mojave Road, Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702) 384-3333. According to a recent article posted on DTCC website, this group seems to be just turning them over to DTCC. So if you are in Nevada, call the Foundation if you have a tortoise to give up or just to inquire about adopting one. It’s still a mess but maybe you can save a tortoise from euthanasia.

In case you hadn’t noticed: Spring has officially arrived in Southern Nevada.

Mojave Max, the famous desert tortoise, emerged from his burrow at 12:41 p.m. today to herald the official arrival of spring in the desert. It is, according to officials with the Clark County Desert Conservation Program and the federal Bureau of Land Management, the latest he has come out since 2000.

Woo! Good Morning Mojave Max!

Mojave Max, a desert tortoise whose first appearance is seen as a sign of spring, has emerged from his burrow at the Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area near Las Vegas.

A Clark County spokeswoman says Mojave Max emerged just after 2 p.m. Tuesday. It’s not the earliest or the latest the captive mascot has emerged from his reptilian form of winter hibernation in the 12 years since the tradition began. The winter nap is called brumation.

The earliest was Feb. 14. The latest was April 14. Last year, it was March 30. Warm temperatures, longer daylight hours and an internal clock are believed to be factors in the timing.

An annual contest lets southern Nevada schoolchildren guess the date and time Max will emerge. A winner hasn’t been announced yet.

(Source http://northwest.8newsnow.com/news/events/mojave-max-rises-and-shines/99913 )