randythomas:

Remember Sam the turtle I posted a pic of a while back? Well this is his cousin Ben. And Ben has a thing for wanting to walk down the middle of the road instead of in the turtle lane (nice safe grass). I have to help him find the turtle lane from time to time. Oh and he is so cute hissing at me like he’s scary and stuff. Once I got him in the grass he seemed to chill out. Bye Ben! Stay in the turtle lane Ben! #IStopForTurtles #turtle #wildlife #florida #YeahIPickedUpATurtle

You deserve a ton of these:

Buy Toys not Turtles: A #TMNT movie PSA – Part 1 of 3 

Tonight, Millions will head to the theater to see the latest rendition of #TMNT. I hope those of us with turts and torts of our own, as well as those who love them, will take a moment to remind others that turtles (and tortoises) are not toys. They are amazing animals that require specific care and a long term commitment. 

Please watch and share!

harrythetortoise:

Weeeee…….. Look at me, I’m flying!

Oh, I might have gotten myself stuck.

Stop laughing and help me!!

harrythetortoise:

Weeeee…….. Look at me, I’m flying!

Oh, I might have gotten myself stuck.

Stop laughing and help me!!

Tortoises learn to use touchscreens & researchers gain insight into how their minds work (pet rock my shell… ) 

The video shows one of the tortoises in action. Read more below or the full article at LiveScience 

(Via LiveScience ) 

Red-footed tortoises are often household pets. If you own one, you may have to share your tablet computer or smartphone with it from now on. With the right training, they can operate touch-screen interfaces. Researchers led by Dr. Anna Wilkinson of the University of Lincoln (UK) created a touch-screen activity that red-footed tortoises were able to understand. 

The tortoises not only mastered the task in exchange for strawberries, but the animals also transferred their knowledge to a real-life setting. “Generally people see reptiles as inert, stupid and unresponsive,” said Anna Wilkinson, one of the study’s lead researchers and a senior lecturer of animal cognition at the University of Lincoln in England. “I would like people to see that there is something much more complex going on.”

The tortoises, which are native to Central and South America, don’t have a hippocampus, an area of the brain associated with learning, memory and spatial navigation, Wilkinson said. Instead, red-footed tortoises may rely on an area of the brain called the medial cortex, an area associated with complex cognitive behavior and decision making in people. To understand how tortoises learn, the researchers tested how the reptiles relied on cues to get around.

Wilkinson’s colleagues at the University of Vienna gave the tortoises treats when the reptiles looked at, approached and then pecked on the screen.

The four red-footed tortoises in the study learned how to use touch screens fairly quickly, Wilkinson said.

“It’s comparable to the speed with which the pigeons and rats do it,” Wilkinson told Live Science. “I’ve trained dogs to use a touch screen and I’d say the tortoises are faster.”