Bubbles the tortoise miraculously survived 48 hrs underwater. rescued by her owner who donned a wetsuit and dived into the cold pond to save his shell friend. 

(Source: Gazette-news.co.uk )

A concerned owner was left shell-shocked when he found his pet tortoise in his pond after two days of being missing – alive.

The miracle reptile called Bubble is more than 60 years old, but is thought to have survived her underwater adventure due to the cold environment.

Owner Chris Casswell said: “I got into the pond in my wetsuit and found her three feet underwater in the pond.

“She was in a bad way so we took her to the vets and he said he had known a tortoise survive 24 hours but not 48 hours underwater before.

“Because it was cold they slow down into hibernation and they are very good at holding their breath.”

She is now said to be feeling much better and has been reunited with her male companion, Sandra.

jillietoyo:

Once again some wonderful weather to let me to romp around. My owner loves to make me pose in odd photo shoots. This one didn’t bother me as we spent time together just a bit windy though .I don’t mind it.
Ask me questions Im open for anything plus my owner as well can answer your questions

Your turtly friend

Freddy

HI FREDDY! Those are some nice dandelions! Are you gonna eat em all?? huh? are you? nomnomnom… 

mangomusings:

Thank you April for giving me my very own baseball hat! Now we can cheer together.

uh oh! Its On Mango! its on! heee Zoya has her own red sox shirt. (She’s just kidding! mostly… heh heh heh)  #TortoiseBaseballWars #GoodFun

rhamphotheca:

Turtles that eat bone, rocks and soil, and turtles that mine

by Darren Naish

My huge friend and colleague Mathew Wedel owns a Box turtle Terrapene carolina. It’s called Eastie… don’t judge; this is because the animal is an Eastern box turtle (or is she? I wonder if Eastie is a Three-toed box turtle). Anyway, Eastie recently found part of a deceased rat’s head while on a backyard jaunt, and proceeded to deliberately snip away at the broken braincase and eat the bone fragments. This bone-eating carried on for about 20 minutes, and Matt thought it interesting enough to take the photo you see here (TL).

The eating of bones – osteophagy – is well known for turtles, has been recorded in several species, and is observed easily enough in species kept in captivity (like Testudo tortoises). Whenever this subject is mentioned (believe me, it’s always cropping up in conversation), many people recall the photo in David Attenborough’s Life on Earth that shows an Aldabran giant tortoise Aldabrachelys gigantea* scavenging on the carcass of a conspecific (Attenborough 1984) (TR).

As you can see here, it’s not entirely clear what the tortoise is doing, but it looks like it’s gnawing at dried skin and muscle, not bone. Incidentally, the photo was taken by Attenborough himself. I did used to have a very neat photo showing gnaw marks that a pet tortoise (belonging to my late friend and colleague David Cooper) left on a cow bone – to my frustration, I can no longer locate it…

(read more: Tetrapod Zoology – Scientific American)

photos: Mathew Wedel, David Attenborough, and Utahcamera

* Yes, it is actually a 3-toed Box Turtle (T. c. triunguis)

rhamphotheca:

Turtles that eat bone, rocks and soil, and turtles that mine

by Darren Naish

My huge friend and colleague Mathew Wedel owns a Box turtle Terrapene carolina. It’s called Eastie… don’t judge; this is because the animal is an Eastern box turtle (or is she? I wonder if Eastie is a Three-toed box turtle). Anyway, Eastie recently found part of a deceased rat’s head while on a backyard jaunt, and proceeded to deliberately snip away at the broken braincase and eat the bone fragments. This bone-eating carried on for about 20 minutes, and Matt thought it interesting enough to take the photo you see here (TL).

The eating of bones – osteophagy – is well known for turtles, has been recorded in several species, and is observed easily enough in species kept in captivity (like Testudo tortoises). Whenever this subject is mentioned (believe me, it’s always cropping up in conversation), many people recall the photo in David Attenborough’s Life on Earth that shows an Aldabran giant tortoise Aldabrachelys gigantea* scavenging on the carcass of a conspecific (Attenborough 1984) (TR).

As you can see here, it’s not entirely clear what the tortoise is doing, but it looks like it’s gnawing at dried skin and muscle, not bone. Incidentally, the photo was taken by Attenborough himself. I did used to have a very neat photo showing gnaw marks that a pet tortoise (belonging to my late friend and colleague David Cooper) left on a cow bone – to my frustration, I can no longer locate it…

(read more: Tetrapod Zoology – Scientific American)

photos: Mathew Wedel, David Attenborough, and Utahcamera

* Yes, it is actually a 3-toed Box Turtle (T. c. triunguis)

rhamphotheca:

Turtles that eat bone, rocks and soil, and turtles that mine

by Darren Naish

My huge friend and colleague Mathew Wedel owns a Box turtle Terrapene carolina. It’s called Eastie… don’t judge; this is because the animal is an Eastern box turtle (or is she? I wonder if Eastie is a Three-toed box turtle). Anyway, Eastie recently found part of a deceased rat’s head while on a backyard jaunt, and proceeded to deliberately snip away at the broken braincase and eat the bone fragments. This bone-eating carried on for about 20 minutes, and Matt thought it interesting enough to take the photo you see here (TL).

The eating of bones – osteophagy – is well known for turtles, has been recorded in several species, and is observed easily enough in species kept in captivity (like Testudo tortoises). Whenever this subject is mentioned (believe me, it’s always cropping up in conversation), many people recall the photo in David Attenborough’s Life on Earth that shows an Aldabran giant tortoise Aldabrachelys gigantea* scavenging on the carcass of a conspecific (Attenborough 1984) (TR).

As you can see here, it’s not entirely clear what the tortoise is doing, but it looks like it’s gnawing at dried skin and muscle, not bone. Incidentally, the photo was taken by Attenborough himself. I did used to have a very neat photo showing gnaw marks that a pet tortoise (belonging to my late friend and colleague David Cooper) left on a cow bone – to my frustration, I can no longer locate it…

(read more: Tetrapod Zoology – Scientific American)

photos: Mathew Wedel, David Attenborough, and Utahcamera

* Yes, it is actually a 3-toed Box Turtle (T. c. triunguis)

Will Arnett on the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles [x]

Will Arnett is clearly aware of the impending #turtpocalypse and knows to respect. 

Will Arnett on the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles [x]

Will Arnett is clearly aware of the impending #turtpocalypse and knows to respect. 

Will Arnett on the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles [x]

Will Arnett is clearly aware of the impending #turtpocalypse and knows to respect. 

Will Arnett on the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles [x]

Will Arnett is clearly aware of the impending #turtpocalypse and knows to respect.