rambosaysso:

It’s our 2 year Irwinversary today.

Irwin doesn’t have a birthday and I don’t know his hatchday… but it was the 1st of Jan two years ago that I adopted him.

He’s about roughly 4-5 years old now I reckon but when I got him he was about 3 months away from dying.

He had Severe MBD and multiple leg bone fractures. He was as soft as a squeaky toy and his shell would flex as he struggled to breathe.

He couldnt walk properly or lift his shell off the ground, and for the first 6 weeks I had him he dragged his back legs behind him while he kinda swam with his front legs. I used to have to sink his food bowl right into the substrate so it was level because he couldn’t climb over the ‘lip’ to reach his food.

I spent 8 months syringe feeding him liquid calcium before he stopped being at risk of just dropping dead.

I had to learn a lot about reptiles and fast.

And I’m still learning.

But my God, what a rewarding two years it’s been. Who could have known how important this little creme brulee booger would become to me??.

He is fascinating,determined, weird, adorable and funny!. (And now that tortoise puberty has hit he is also a bit gross at times).

The trust he shows me blows my mind and my endlessly thankful he came into my life.

Reptiles are hard work, don’t ever be fooled into thinking they’re an easy pet just because they’re quiet.

They need specialist lighting and supliments, specific heating and humidity. I have found myself growing weeds in windowsill pots and worrying about the dangers of pesticides or pollution. Searching tirelessly for the first and last Dandelions of the season. I have had full blown panic attacks over poops…or lack thereof. Sometimes even now if he is sound asleep, basking with his little neck lolling to the side a sudden fear grips me and I have to gently blow on him to see him twitch so I know he’s alive.

And Christ…I haven’t even attempted hibernation yet.

We will see what comes. But I am very thankful I get to see it with Irwin

😭😭🙌🙌 ❤️❤️❤️

We are so happy you and Irwin found each other and so thankful to you for sharing him and your journey with all of us!! Happiest Irwinversary!

Honestly, If I had to pick a post that best captured the reality of caring for a tort, it’s this one. The worry, the struggle, the FEAR that always lingers,  the learning, the awe, the joy… it’s every single one of these emotions in a shell made of gratitude and love.  It’s not easy. if you think it is you better stick to pictures on the internet. Nope, not easy but man is it rewarding.

catellites:

Meet Benn Scully the tortoise—We rescued this qt today after our old neighbors just left him on their porch in a super small aquarium out in the cold. It’s only been a few ours and we’ve already bonded. :3

Oh man I don’t know what was wrong with your neighbors cause Benn Scully Is a looker. Seems to approve of you. I think you may have just rescued your new best friend forever! 

A Norfolk firefighter was called to an unusual shout today – after a tortoise got stuck in a sundial.

(Source: independent.co.uk)

Tommy the tortoise hissed as he struggled to free himself from the pattern of the garden ornament in Garlondes, East Harling, after attempts by his owner were unsuccessful, the Eastern Daily Press reported.

Norfolk Fire Services firefighter Derek Sim accepted the challenge to free the anxious tortoise at around 3pm.

“His foot was well trapped and the sundial was heavy so we used some good old Vaseline.

“I rubbed it on his foot and we tipped the sundial over while the owner held Tommy and we managed to wriggle him out,” he told the newspaper.

Mr Sim said Tommy had been “quite distressed” during the rescue, and was taken to the vets by his owner after the ordeal.

He added: “There are a couple of us in the station with more than 20 years experience and neither of us have ever seen anything like that. It was certainly a first for me.”

Sherri Fields of Punta Gorda, FL is a Hero. After cohabiting with an increasing number of gopher tortoises and their burrow, she was horrified to discover city works destroying these tortoises’ peaceful habitat, even if it was unintended.This woman took the ‘see something, say something’ philosophy we tout so often these days,and used it to protect her non human neighbors. While she sadly points out that it will not save those whose burrows have already been affected, she has done much to bring attention to the innocent, state protected, bystanders being harmed by this clean up attempt. Garnering media attention and alerting the city, she’s most definitely on the tortoise ‘nice’ list for her efforts. To that I give Sherri a high five and hope that we all take a tip from her actions, keeping an eye out for all our shelled friends… in and out of the water. 

Read the article below and click the source to view the news video of Sherri and her neighborhood tortoises in action. 

(Source: WINK News Now)

PUNTA GORDA, Fl. – Sherri Fileds has lived in this neighborhood for 20 years.  One thing she loves, sharing the property with the burrowing wildlife.

“These turtles have taken over the end of this creek bank and there are a lot of turtles here and this has been their safety zone for 20 years,” she says.

It’s why she was so upset Monday when she saw the place these state protcted tortoises live torn up.

“Look at how they left this…. I mean this looks like a war zone here… this area didn’t look this bad when hurricane Charley came through,” she adds.

County Public Worls crews say they were doing maintencance work and clearing the area so heavy rains wouldn’t cause drainage backups.

“Any kind of commercial, industrial, residential development you have to abide by the regulations. there is a whole series of them,” says retired consulting ecologist, Nigel Morris.

Florida Fish and Wildlife officials say, gopher tortoises are supposed to be relocated before any land clearing or development can take place.  But public works officials say, they didn’t know there were nests here.  They have stopped the job and removed their eqitment.  They are alos bring in an environmentalist to survey the area for burrows.

“I know going forward this may help other gopher turtles… but it’s not helping the ones that are dying today,” Fields adds.

Sherri Fields of Punta Gorda, FL is a Hero. After cohabiting with an increasing number of gopher tortoises and their burrow, she was horrified to discover city works destroying these tortoises’ peaceful habitat, even if it was unintended.This woman took the ‘see something, say something’ philosophy we tout so often these days,and used it to protect her non human neighbors. While she sadly points out that it will not save those whose burrows have already been affected, she has done much to bring attention to the innocent, state protected, bystanders being harmed by this clean up attempt. Garnering media attention and alerting the city, she’s most definitely on the tortoise ‘nice’ list for her efforts. To that I give Sherri a high five and hope that we all take a tip from her actions, keeping an eye out for all our shelled friends… in and out of the water. 

Read the article below and click the source to view the news video of Sherri and her neighborhood tortoises in action. 

(Source: WINK News Now)

PUNTA GORDA, Fl. – Sherri Fileds has lived in this neighborhood for 20 years.  One thing she loves, sharing the property with the burrowing wildlife.

“These turtles have taken over the end of this creek bank and there are a lot of turtles here and this has been their safety zone for 20 years,” she says.

It’s why she was so upset Monday when she saw the place these state protcted tortoises live torn up.

“Look at how they left this…. I mean this looks like a war zone here… this area didn’t look this bad when hurricane Charley came through,” she adds.

County Public Worls crews say they were doing maintencance work and clearing the area so heavy rains wouldn’t cause drainage backups.

“Any kind of commercial, industrial, residential development you have to abide by the regulations. there is a whole series of them,” says retired consulting ecologist, Nigel Morris.

Florida Fish and Wildlife officials say, gopher tortoises are supposed to be relocated before any land clearing or development can take place.  But public works officials say, they didn’t know there were nests here.  They have stopped the job and removed their eqitment.  They are alos bring in an environmentalist to survey the area for burrows.

“I know going forward this may help other gopher turtles… but it’s not helping the ones that are dying today,” Fields adds.

Sherri Fields of Punta Gorda, FL is a Hero. After cohabiting with an increasing number of gopher tortoises and their burrow, she was horrified to discover city works destroying these tortoises’ peaceful habitat, even if it was unintended.This woman took the ‘see something, say something’ philosophy we tout so often these days,and used it to protect her non human neighbors. While she sadly points out that it will not save those whose burrows have already been affected, she has done much to bring attention to the innocent, state protected, bystanders being harmed by this clean up attempt. Garnering media attention and alerting the city, she’s most definitely on the tortoise ‘nice’ list for her efforts. To that I give Sherri a high five and hope that we all take a tip from her actions, keeping an eye out for all our shelled friends… in and out of the water. 

Read the article below and click the source to view the news video of Sherri and her neighborhood tortoises in action. 

(Source: WINK News Now)

PUNTA GORDA, Fl. – Sherri Fileds has lived in this neighborhood for 20 years.  One thing she loves, sharing the property with the burrowing wildlife.

“These turtles have taken over the end of this creek bank and there are a lot of turtles here and this has been their safety zone for 20 years,” she says.

It’s why she was so upset Monday when she saw the place these state protcted tortoises live torn up.

“Look at how they left this…. I mean this looks like a war zone here… this area didn’t look this bad when hurricane Charley came through,” she adds.

County Public Worls crews say they were doing maintencance work and clearing the area so heavy rains wouldn’t cause drainage backups.

“Any kind of commercial, industrial, residential development you have to abide by the regulations. there is a whole series of them,” says retired consulting ecologist, Nigel Morris.

Florida Fish and Wildlife officials say, gopher tortoises are supposed to be relocated before any land clearing or development can take place.  But public works officials say, they didn’t know there were nests here.  They have stopped the job and removed their eqitment.  They are alos bring in an environmentalist to survey the area for burrows.

“I know going forward this may help other gopher turtles… but it’s not helping the ones that are dying today,” Fields adds.

Sherri Fields of Punta Gorda, FL is a Hero. After cohabiting with an increasing number of gopher tortoises and their burrow, she was horrified to discover city works destroying these tortoises’ peaceful habitat, even if it was unintended.This woman took the ‘see something, say something’ philosophy we tout so often these days,and used it to protect her non human neighbors. While she sadly points out that it will not save those whose burrows have already been affected, she has done much to bring attention to the innocent, state protected, bystanders being harmed by this clean up attempt. Garnering media attention and alerting the city, she’s most definitely on the tortoise ‘nice’ list for her efforts. To that I give Sherri a high five and hope that we all take a tip from her actions, keeping an eye out for all our shelled friends… in and out of the water. 

Read the article below and click the source to view the news video of Sherri and her neighborhood tortoises in action. 

(Source: WINK News Now)

PUNTA GORDA, Fl. – Sherri Fileds has lived in this neighborhood for 20 years.  One thing she loves, sharing the property with the burrowing wildlife.

“These turtles have taken over the end of this creek bank and there are a lot of turtles here and this has been their safety zone for 20 years,” she says.

It’s why she was so upset Monday when she saw the place these state protcted tortoises live torn up.

“Look at how they left this…. I mean this looks like a war zone here… this area didn’t look this bad when hurricane Charley came through,” she adds.

County Public Worls crews say they were doing maintencance work and clearing the area so heavy rains wouldn’t cause drainage backups.

“Any kind of commercial, industrial, residential development you have to abide by the regulations. there is a whole series of them,” says retired consulting ecologist, Nigel Morris.

Florida Fish and Wildlife officials say, gopher tortoises are supposed to be relocated before any land clearing or development can take place.  But public works officials say, they didn’t know there were nests here.  They have stopped the job and removed their eqitment.  They are alos bring in an environmentalist to survey the area for burrows.

“I know going forward this may help other gopher turtles… but it’s not helping the ones that are dying today,” Fields adds.

Sherri Fields of Punta Gorda, FL is a Hero. After cohabiting with an increasing number of gopher tortoises and their burrow, she was horrified to discover city works destroying these tortoises’ peaceful habitat, even if it was unintended.This woman took the ‘see something, say something’ philosophy we tout so often these days,and used it to protect her non human neighbors. While she sadly points out that it will not save those whose burrows have already been affected, she has done much to bring attention to the innocent, state protected, bystanders being harmed by this clean up attempt. Garnering media attention and alerting the city, she’s most definitely on the tortoise ‘nice’ list for her efforts. To that I give Sherri a high five and hope that we all take a tip from her actions, keeping an eye out for all our shelled friends… in and out of the water. 

Read the article below and click the source to view the news video of Sherri and her neighborhood tortoises in action. 

(Source: WINK News Now)

PUNTA GORDA, Fl. – Sherri Fileds has lived in this neighborhood for 20 years.  One thing she loves, sharing the property with the burrowing wildlife.

“These turtles have taken over the end of this creek bank and there are a lot of turtles here and this has been their safety zone for 20 years,” she says.

It’s why she was so upset Monday when she saw the place these state protcted tortoises live torn up.

“Look at how they left this…. I mean this looks like a war zone here… this area didn’t look this bad when hurricane Charley came through,” she adds.

County Public Worls crews say they were doing maintencance work and clearing the area so heavy rains wouldn’t cause drainage backups.

“Any kind of commercial, industrial, residential development you have to abide by the regulations. there is a whole series of them,” says retired consulting ecologist, Nigel Morris.

Florida Fish and Wildlife officials say, gopher tortoises are supposed to be relocated before any land clearing or development can take place.  But public works officials say, they didn’t know there were nests here.  They have stopped the job and removed their eqitment.  They are alos bring in an environmentalist to survey the area for burrows.

“I know going forward this may help other gopher turtles… but it’s not helping the ones that are dying today,” Fields adds.

A hero! Click through to see more pics and see if there is something you can do.

Also? Florida? Come on! Enough with these policies that risk the lives of endangered species. 

Written by Laura Guttridge of Florida

I have been a volunteer for the Vero Beach Humane Society for many years. As a volunteer, I got notice from them that a 38 acre site in Vero Beach was under construction. Unfortunately, this land was the home to dozens of the endangered gopher tortoises. A controversial state law in Florida allows developers to pay into a land management program, and then plow over gopher tortoise burrows condemning the tortoises inside to a slow death. The entombed tortoise can live for up to 6 months underground before dying of starvation and suffocation.

Typically citizens are not allowed to re-locate gopher tortoises. However, The Florida Fish and Wildlife conservation commission changed its rules, putting aside the required complicated permitting process typically required before relocating gopher tortoises, so we could rescue them.

Ilka Daniels, director of outreach services for the VBHS, spearheaded the efforts, and for the first time regular citizens were allowed to relocate the endangered gopher tortoises. We would wake up early every morning and search the site for wandering tortoises, and we also set up bucket traps to catch them, so we could get them out of harms way. We even excavated burrows, digging deep into their tunnels to find them. One tortoise we rescued was injured and needed to be rehabilitated. All the others we were able to find and save were measured, weighed, numbered and photographed before being sent to a holding pen, until they could be release into their new 18 acre preserve. They would be taken outside daily to roam in the Florida sunshine and eat fresh grass while they waited to be released into their new home.

At the end of our rescue, which took months, we managed to saved 31 of the endangered gopher tortoises. Private land owners can actually be provided with financial incentives by establishing tortoise preserves. Anyone who has ever had the opportunity to get to know one of these amazing

Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/volunteers-stop-bulldozers-from-burying-tortoises-alive.html#ixzz205Qs0mko

A hero! Click through to see more pics and see if there is something you can do.

Also? Florida? Come on! Enough with these policies that risk the lives of endangered species. 

Written by Laura Guttridge of Florida

I have been a volunteer for the Vero Beach Humane Society for many years. As a volunteer, I got notice from them that a 38 acre site in Vero Beach was under construction. Unfortunately, this land was the home to dozens of the endangered gopher tortoises. A controversial state law in Florida allows developers to pay into a land management program, and then plow over gopher tortoise burrows condemning the tortoises inside to a slow death. The entombed tortoise can live for up to 6 months underground before dying of starvation and suffocation.

Typically citizens are not allowed to re-locate gopher tortoises. However, The Florida Fish and Wildlife conservation commission changed its rules, putting aside the required complicated permitting process typically required before relocating gopher tortoises, so we could rescue them.

Ilka Daniels, director of outreach services for the VBHS, spearheaded the efforts, and for the first time regular citizens were allowed to relocate the endangered gopher tortoises. We would wake up early every morning and search the site for wandering tortoises, and we also set up bucket traps to catch them, so we could get them out of harms way. We even excavated burrows, digging deep into their tunnels to find them. One tortoise we rescued was injured and needed to be rehabilitated. All the others we were able to find and save were measured, weighed, numbered and photographed before being sent to a holding pen, until they could be release into their new 18 acre preserve. They would be taken outside daily to roam in the Florida sunshine and eat fresh grass while they waited to be released into their new home.

At the end of our rescue, which took months, we managed to saved 31 of the endangered gopher tortoises. Private land owners can actually be provided with financial incentives by establishing tortoise preserves. Anyone who has ever had the opportunity to get to know one of these amazing

Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/volunteers-stop-bulldozers-from-burying-tortoises-alive.html#ixzz205Qs0mko