The Sea Turtle Conservancy @ConserveTurtles needs our help this #GivingTuesday! 

Funds raised during this campaign will support much-needed repairs to STC’s field station in Tortuguero, Costa Rica, one of the most important sea turtle nesting sites in the world. STC’s station is showing the effects of 20 years of exposure to Tortuguero’s wet, salty climate, and urgent repairs are needed to keep our researchers and volunteers safe and dry as they monitor and protect this critical nesting beach.Double your donation! Help turn $15,000 into $30,000. STC’s Board of Directors has generously offered to match every $1 donated (up to $15,000) on December 2nd, 2014. 

Click here to make a donation!

And Spread the word! 

The Turtle Rescue Of Long Island needs our help to cut electricity costs with Solar power!

TRLI is an incredible turtle/tortoise rescue run by NY state licenced wildlife rehabilitator Julie Maguire. They are a hub for sick, injured and abandoned turtles and tortoises in the state wide.  The expenses required to run a rescue like this are high. Sick and injured turtles (as well as healthy ones) relay on controlled lighting and heat to recover and grow healthy enough for release and adoption. Solar would reduce the lofty cost of electric in the long run and ensure the great work  Director Julie Maguire and TRLI do can continue long term!

Please take a moment to visit their gofundme site HERE Donate if you can, and spread the word to others who can as well! 

Or visit their website to make a general donation, and for a world of resources on turtle and tortoise care! Join the mailing lists! Julie herself  goes above and beyond to provide resources on proper care and is always willing to answer the questions of owners.

 Let’s keep them going this #GivingTuesday! 

 

Happy #GivingTuesday! Remember to give what you can, cause our shell friends deserve a chance too!

Donate, Volunteer, spread the word, share knowledge, ask questions!

And of course, neck rubs are also accepted. 

More ways to help coming throughout the day! And check out the preview of our (soon to be far more comprehensive) Tort-time Giving Hub! 

Today’s Featured Organization is The Wildlife Center of Virginia!
Most recently in the news for taking in and caring for the eastern box turtle that was painted pink. They have worked hard to educate children and adults about appropriate actions when encountering a turtle or tortoise in the wild. Having seen too many turtles, injured, abused, painted, etc, they created Wilson’s Turtle Promise! A pledge to do whats best for wild turtles, Leave them alone or help them in the direction they are going. 
They are an award winning Wildlife Rescue center that working to provide quality emergency and longer term care for rescued wildlife while engaging the public through learning events, awareness campaigns, and training future rehabers. 
 
About The Wildlife Center of Virginia (From their Website): 
The Wildlife Center of Virginia was formed in 1982 to provide quality health care, often on an emergency basis, to native wildlife.

Since 1982, the Wildlife Center has:

  • treated more than 65,000 wild animals, representing more than 200 species of native birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians.
  • shared the lessons learned from these cases with some 1.5 million school-children and adults across Virginia.
  • trained a corps of wildlife medicine practitioners, including veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and volunteer wildlife rehabilitators. Those who have benefited from the professional training programs offered by the Center may now be found on the cutting-edge of wildlife veterinary medicine around the world.

In 2007, the Wildlife Center received the National Conservation Achievement Award from the National Wildlife Federation as the Conservation Organization of the Year.

How To Help:

Today’s Featured Organization is The Wildlife Center of Virginia!
Most recently in the news for taking in and caring for the eastern box turtle that was painted pink. They have worked hard to educate children and adults about appropriate actions when encountering a turtle or tortoise in the wild. Having seen too many turtles, injured, abused, painted, etc, they created Wilson’s Turtle Promise! A pledge to do whats best for wild turtles, Leave them alone or help them in the direction they are going. 
They are an award winning Wildlife Rescue center that working to provide quality emergency and longer term care for rescued wildlife while engaging the public through learning events, awareness campaigns, and training future rehabers. 
 
About The Wildlife Center of Virginia (From their Website): 
The Wildlife Center of Virginia was formed in 1982 to provide quality health care, often on an emergency basis, to native wildlife.

Since 1982, the Wildlife Center has:

  • treated more than 65,000 wild animals, representing more than 200 species of native birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians.
  • shared the lessons learned from these cases with some 1.5 million school-children and adults across Virginia.
  • trained a corps of wildlife medicine practitioners, including veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and volunteer wildlife rehabilitators. Those who have benefited from the professional training programs offered by the Center may now be found on the cutting-edge of wildlife veterinary medicine around the world.

In 2007, the Wildlife Center received the National Conservation Achievement Award from the National Wildlife Federation as the Conservation Organization of the Year.

How To Help:

Today’s Featured Organization is The Wildlife Center of Virginia!
Most recently in the news for taking in and caring for the eastern box turtle that was painted pink. They have worked hard to educate children and adults about appropriate actions when encountering a turtle or tortoise in the wild. Having seen too many turtles, injured, abused, painted, etc, they created Wilson’s Turtle Promise! A pledge to do whats best for wild turtles, Leave them alone or help them in the direction they are going. 
They are an award winning Wildlife Rescue center that working to provide quality emergency and longer term care for rescued wildlife while engaging the public through learning events, awareness campaigns, and training future rehabers. 
 
About The Wildlife Center of Virginia (From their Website): 
The Wildlife Center of Virginia was formed in 1982 to provide quality health care, often on an emergency basis, to native wildlife.

Since 1982, the Wildlife Center has:

  • treated more than 65,000 wild animals, representing more than 200 species of native birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians.
  • shared the lessons learned from these cases with some 1.5 million school-children and adults across Virginia.
  • trained a corps of wildlife medicine practitioners, including veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and volunteer wildlife rehabilitators. Those who have benefited from the professional training programs offered by the Center may now be found on the cutting-edge of wildlife veterinary medicine around the world.

In 2007, the Wildlife Center received the National Conservation Achievement Award from the National Wildlife Federation as the Conservation Organization of the Year.

How To Help:

Wildlife Center Of Virginia

Today’s Featured Organization is The Wildlife Center of Virginia!
Most recently in the news for taking in and caring for the eastern box turtle that was painted pink. They have worked hard to educate children and adults about appropriate actions when encountering a turtle or tortoise in the wild. Having seen too many turtles, injured, abused, painted, etc, they created Wilson’s Turtle Promise! A pledge to do whats best for wild turtles, Leave them alone or help them in the direction they are going.
They are an award winning Wildlife Rescue center that working to provide quality emergency and longer term care for rescued wildlife while engaging the public through learning events, awareness campaigns, and training future rehabers.
 
About The Wildlife Center of Virginia (From their Website): 
The Wildlife Center of Virginia was formed in 1982 to provide quality health care, often on an emergency basis, to native wildlife.

Continue reading “Wildlife Center Of Virginia”

Todays Featured Organization is The Tiger Frances Foundation! @TigerFrances 
An organization built out of pure love, The Tiger Frances Foundation rescues retrains and rehomes abused and abandoned animals. They don’t see these animals as lost causes, they see a need for love and care and seek to provide the animals with future filled with the same!
Recently, they have acquired their own dedicated foster house, providing the animals with 24 hour care and room to play. They also share their mission with organizations like The School on Wheels and the Girl Scouts, spreading ideas of compassion for all, including animals, through learning events. 
They are a new and growing foundation, on the front lines of the animal abuse and homelessness epidemic. Every penny donated helps the animals in their care and those that will be in the future. Check out their site see pictures and videos of the amazing animals they’ve helped, read about their events, and to make a donation! 
 
ABOUT TIGER FRANCES (From their website)
The Tiger Frances Foundation is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.  Our purpose is to eliminate the abuse of animals.  We believe that animals are the world’s purest embodiment of unconditional love.  Yet this very nature makes them the target for abuse.  Many animals suffering in undesirable situations and shelters are deemed unadoptable. We disagree. More often that not, these animals just need a little more time, a little more patience, and a little more love. Our work has proved this.
TTFF will provide a safe haven of love and support for animals in need. With your help, we will educate and promote our philosophy and experiences through publications, products, public programs, and politics. We want to be the pebble in the pond, the first action that inspires ripples of kindness and love.
Love changes everything.
 
That’s a mission we sure can get behind. Make a donations! Every penny counts.

These Galapagos Tortoises seem to enjoy human contact most, or maybe there’s an itch just.. right there.. no a little …to the left… these short legs are useless for this sorta thing!
The University of Florida, Psychology department, has completed some fascinating research examining the enrichment preferences of captive animals. In this case, do Galapagos tortoises prefer interacting with ‘play’ objects, the sprinkler, or getting a neck rub from one of their keepers?  The hope being, any understanding of their preferences would assist keepers in providing them with the best possible environment.
For the three Galapagos tortoises studied? Their choice was human interaction. “Not only did they prefer keeper interaction overall compared to the traditional forms of enrichment,” Mehrkam said, “but the individual tortoises had preferences for the kind of interaction they wanted. Larry and Curly like having their necks rubbed. Moe liked the shell scrubbing.”  (UFL.edu
Why did they choose human interaction?? Well, that calls for further research… after curly gets his neck rub of course. 

Today’s Featured Organization is The Turtle Survival Alliance! (TSA) @TurtleSurvival
TSA is an organization that does it all.  Forming global partnership to prevent the extinction of endangered turtles and tortoises, supporting and conducting research, and with the opening of their new center they are breeding of at risk turtles and tortoises. 
Mission:
Transforming passion for turtles into effective conservation action through a global network of living collections and recovery programs.
About:
The Turtle Survival Alliance (TSA) is an action-oriented global partnership that is committed to zero turtle extinctions in the 21st century. To achieve this, the TSA:
  • Creates breeding programs, including building facilities, for critically endangered freshwater turtles and tortoises
  • Conducts field research
  • Develops conservation plans and puts those plans into action
  • Promotes conservation awareness among local communities
  • Provides support, knowledge, training and resources to conservation partners around the world
  • Advocates for greater enforcement of wildlife laws
In 2013, the TSA proudly announced breaking ground on the newly purchased Turtle Survival Center (TSC) property in coastal South Carolina. This conservation center provides the TSA the much-needed ability to manage its captive assurance colony programs from a single location and have a facility to call home. The species being managed at the TSC have been carefully chosen based on a variety of criteria such as conservation status, lack of effective in-situ protection and management, poor history of being successfully bred in captivity, and ability to thrive in the mild coastal climate of South Carolina. There are now more than 400 individual turtles and tortoises representing 31 species residing at the TSC.
How to help! 
Spread the word online!

Today’s Featured Organization is The Turtle Survival Alliance! (TSA) @TurtleSurvival
TSA is an organization that does it all.  Forming global partnership to prevent the extinction of endangered turtles and tortoises, supporting and conducting research, and with the opening of their new center they are breeding of at risk turtles and tortoises. 
Mission:
Transforming passion for turtles into effective conservation action through a global network of living collections and recovery programs.
About:
The Turtle Survival Alliance (TSA) is an action-oriented global partnership that is committed to zero turtle extinctions in the 21st century. To achieve this, the TSA:
  • Creates breeding programs, including building facilities, for critically endangered freshwater turtles and tortoises
  • Conducts field research
  • Develops conservation plans and puts those plans into action
  • Promotes conservation awareness among local communities
  • Provides support, knowledge, training and resources to conservation partners around the world
  • Advocates for greater enforcement of wildlife laws
In 2013, the TSA proudly announced breaking ground on the newly purchased Turtle Survival Center (TSC) property in coastal South Carolina. This conservation center provides the TSA the much-needed ability to manage its captive assurance colony programs from a single location and have a facility to call home. The species being managed at the TSC have been carefully chosen based on a variety of criteria such as conservation status, lack of effective in-situ protection and management, poor history of being successfully bred in captivity, and ability to thrive in the mild coastal climate of South Carolina. There are now more than 400 individual turtles and tortoises representing 31 species residing at the TSC.
How to help! 
Spread the word online!

Today’s Featured Organization is The Turtle Survival Alliance! (TSA) @TurtleSurvival
TSA is an organization that does it all.  Forming global partnership to prevent the extinction of endangered turtles and tortoises, supporting and conducting research, and with the opening of their new center they are breeding of at risk turtles and tortoises. 
Mission:
Transforming passion for turtles into effective conservation action through a global network of living collections and recovery programs.
About:
The Turtle Survival Alliance (TSA) is an action-oriented global partnership that is committed to zero turtle extinctions in the 21st century. To achieve this, the TSA:
  • Creates breeding programs, including building facilities, for critically endangered freshwater turtles and tortoises
  • Conducts field research
  • Develops conservation plans and puts those plans into action
  • Promotes conservation awareness among local communities
  • Provides support, knowledge, training and resources to conservation partners around the world
  • Advocates for greater enforcement of wildlife laws
In 2013, the TSA proudly announced breaking ground on the newly purchased Turtle Survival Center (TSC) property in coastal South Carolina. This conservation center provides the TSA the much-needed ability to manage its captive assurance colony programs from a single location and have a facility to call home. The species being managed at the TSC have been carefully chosen based on a variety of criteria such as conservation status, lack of effective in-situ protection and management, poor history of being successfully bred in captivity, and ability to thrive in the mild coastal climate of South Carolina. There are now more than 400 individual turtles and tortoises representing 31 species residing at the TSC.
How to help! 
Spread the word online!

Turtle Survival Alliance

Today’s Featured Organization is The Turtle Survival Alliance! (TSA) @TurtleSurvival
TSA is an organization that does it all.  Forming global partnership to prevent the extinction of endangered turtles and tortoises, supporting and conducting research, and with the opening of their new center they are breeding of at risk turtles and tortoises.
Mission:
Transforming passion for turtles into effective conservation action through a global network of living collections and recovery programs.
About:
The Turtle Survival Alliance (TSA) is an action-oriented global partnership that is committed to zero turtle extinctions in the 21st century. To achieve this, the TSA:

Continue reading “Turtle Survival Alliance”

The Turtle Rescue of Long Island

tort-time:

Today’s Featured Organization is The Turtle Rescue of Long Island!
This organization holds a very special place in my heart. I was lucky to find them when Zoya came into my life and I was searching for good care information. The Turtle Rescue of Long Island’s website and mailing lists (Yahoo Russian Tortoise list & the rescues list) provide a wealth of resources for proper care of turtles and tortoises. 
More over, they have rescued, rehabbed, and released (or adopted out) thousands sick, injured or unwanted turtles and tortoises. They maintain a serious application process for their adoptions that ensure all their adopted animals are going to loving homes that can provide them with long term quality care and those who cannot be adopted out become permanent residents. The video above shows some of the many.
The demand for turtle and tortoise rehab has only increased over time, as have the numbers of abandoned animals. With that comes increased electricity costs, space needs, and maintenance. Run out of long island, the environmental needs are even larger during the winter time.
Take some time to read about their work and consider making giving if you can. Every penny helps! Read Scooters Story: http://www.turtlerescues.org/scooter.htm a special turtle that made a particularly large impact on everyone’s hearts. Check out their facebook page and give them a like!
How to Help! 
Turtle Rescue of Long Island is a non profit organization that has been taking in sick, injured and unwanted pet and native turtles and tortoises for well over ten years. Thousands have come through our doors and been rehabbed and released or adopted to new homes. One of our biggest burdens is the cost of electric to keep filters, heat lamps and heaters going to keep all the turtles and tortoises healthy. We really want to continue this work and hope with the help of our TRLI friends we can raise enough funds to get our roof reinforced and have solar power installed so we can continue for many more years.
Get some holiday gifts for yourself or others that also support TRLI! 
Buy a bottle of wine! -you can choose the type of wine or the type of turtle/tortoise! Makes a great holiday gift!
Turtle Rescue of Long Island is a 501(c)3 non-profit rescue that became incorporated in 2004. We do our best to place all the turtles and tortoises which can no longer be kept for whatever reason that are brought to us. Many people buy a turtle or tortoise and know very little about their care and don’t realize how large or how long turtles and tortoises can live with proper care. Others just find they can no longer care for their turtle or tortoise and just want to find it a good home. Whichever the case, we hope to help find good homes for those that need them.   
We also take in many native and non-native chelonians for rehabilitation. There are cases that can be anything from hit by car, illness, cruelty cases, neglect and abandoned.  Whenever possible all native wildlife is returned to the wild as they should be. Most others are adopted to permanent homes.  
For more information on turtles and tortoises join our Yahoo group. Just click on the link in the menu column. Lots of friendly turtle keepers with a like interest that love sharing advice, stories and more about their turtles and tortoises. Come join us!   http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/TurtleRescueLongIsland/join