mermaid-boyfriend:

how could one go about taking paint of off a turtle shell? (not saying that I’ve painted my turtle, just asking for reference)

Hey there! I promise I’m not judging! Tumblr is a great place to speak your mind, represent your cause and take a stand.. but that sometimes means its also a place where people trying to get information get attacked for asking, sharing what they know, etc… I find that, in the end, that only hurts more than it helps. Regardless of why you ask I’m happy to share info, and I’m very happy you asked 🙂 I’m now gonna try and respond coherently even though its super late here 🙂  

What I learned in my rehab training is that if it’s a small area you may have to cut your losses. The goal as a rehabber is to make the animal as healthy and/or as comfortable as possible. If the area is small, you might decide that trying to remove the paint would be more harmful than leaving it there.  Or, if its extensive, you may decide it needs to be removed or the animal can’t live any sort of healthy life. In that case what you’d want to try first is warm soap & water scrubs with a toothbrush or a scrub brush that’s not too invasive (my immediate thought is a plastic scour pad or the scrub daddy! … cause I watch Shark Tank heh) 

You’re going to be taking layers of paint off slowly, without chemicals, so it will be a process. You don’t want to do too much at one time and hurt the turtle or tort by digging into the shell. That would be painful and more harmful to the turtle/tort. Depending on the type of paint, how much paint there is,  Soapy water scrubs every other day should work over a few weeks. you’ll wanna soak separately and be mindful of the stress level of your turtle/tort. Signs of stress include what looks like Shrugging while making a  breathing noise… It’s a sorta hyperventilating gesture. It’s also a sign of exertion. You’ll want to be sure that doesn’t go on for too long. (scrubbing can cause that.. shells are pretty sensitive) 

Anyone else have thoughts? 

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Holiday Plant Saftey c/o The American Tortoise Rescue ( @tortoiserescue )

An important reminder as our holiday decor starts to die and leave a trail on the floor… 
WED, DEC 17, 2014 23:00 CET Holiday Plant Safety from California Poison Control

American Tortoise Rescue thanks California Poison Control for providing a “Holiday Plant Safety Tip Sheet” that can be used to keep turtles and tortoises, as well as any pets and small children safe during the holidays and after.

Amaryllis ( Hippeastrum spp. ): This exotic plant from tropical America and Africa has brilliant-colored flowers and green strap-shaped leaves. A stomach-ache can occur if the bulb is eaten.

Christmas Cactus: This is an old favorite during the holiday season. The arching, drooping branches are made up of flattened, scallop-edged, smooth, bright green, spineless joints. Rosy purplish, red flowers appear at Christmas time. This plant is considered non-toxic.

Christmas Trees (Cedar): Eating the bark can cause a stomach-ache. The sap may cause an itchy skin rash.

Christmas Trees (Pine, Spruce & Fir): The needles can cause choking, but are non-toxic.

Holly berries ( Ilex spp. ): The bright red berries of this plant are especially attractive to small children. Nibbling on one or two berries will not cause any symptoms. Swallowing more, however, can result in nausea, vomiting, stomach pain and diarrhea.

Jerusalem Cherry ( Solanum pseudocapsicum ): Swallowing this ornamental plant can result in vomiting, redness of the skin, drowsiness or restlessness, and hallucinations. This plant has bright orange and dark red berries. In rare cases, seizures may occur.

Mistletoe ( Phoradendron spp. ): All parts of the plant contain toxic substances and if eaten can cause vomiting, diarrhea and stomach pain. One to two berries or leaves eaten by a child will NOT result in serious harm. As a precaution when hanging mistletoe in your home, place it in a piece of netting or a plastic sandwich bag.

Poinsettia ( Euphorbia spp. ): Eating many leaves may cause mild stomach upset. The sap from the plant may cause skin rash and should be washed off with soap and water. Contrary to earlier beliefs, poinsettias are safe in the home during the holidays.

Pyracantha ( Pyracantha spp. ): This plant is often used in holiday center-piece decorations because of its showy ornamental appearance. It has oblong, shiny leaves, white flowers and a lot of berries during the winter season. If large amounts of berries are eaten, a stomach-ache may result. However, most experts say it is safe for decorating use during the holidays.

Rosary Pea or the Jequirity Bean ( Abrus precatorius ): The jequirity bean, commonly used in Mexico, is often used in jewelry making because of its dark red color and black tipped end. There is no harm if the beans are swallowed whole, but can be life-threatening if they are chewed prior to swallowing. Vomiting and stomach-ache occurs within a few hours after swallowing. This is followed by bloody diarrhea.

If you have questions about the plants listed above or any other plants in your home, call the CPCS at 800-222-1222 . Always keep plants out of reach of small children and animals.

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 About The American Tortoise Rescue:

American Tortoise Rescue is a nonprofit founded in 1990 for the protection of all species of turtles and tortoises. We have rescued more than 3,000 since our inception. Foundlings that cannot be adopted because of ill health remain in the care of ATR for the remainder of their lives. ATR acts as a clearinghouse for information about turtle care. We work to abolish “live market” slaughter of turtles in the US, the cruel importation and exploitation of a variety of species and protecting the desert tortoise.

Demand Reform of the Turtle Trade

Demand Reform of the Turtle Trade

turtleconservancy:

It seems this hatchling Flat-tailed Tortoise (Pyxis planicauda) has picked up a hitchhiker! 

Well sometimes the tortoise taxi is ok. When you’re both small and sorta slow team work can be fortuitous 🙂 

turtleconservancy:

Why is this Burmese monk so happy? Is it because he is holding an Elongated Tortoise? Or has he found enlightenment? Maybe they are one in the same. 

Peace and grounded in nature. 

We have something to learn from both of them. 

“Salt minus water plus a lot of sunlight equals turtles encased in a life-threatening hard coating.”

An ‘action’ piece from the take part website shows the impact of the California drought on area turtles. Basking after being in overly salty waters has caused these ‘helmets’ to form, thus leading to area turtles found to be in a weakened state. Many have been rescued thanks to UCLA biologists working with the turtle conservancy, to rehabilitate these turtles and maintain populations numbers. 

Read more! 

(Source:  Jessica Dollin viaTakePart )

These Turtles Have Formed Helmets Thanks to Extreme Drought—Too Bad It Won’t Protect Them From It

Emaciated, dehydrated, and stressed-out. Those words aren’t usually associated with turtles, but biologists from UCLA had to rescue ones fitting that exact description from a drought-ridden lake in Southern California.

Thanks in part to the state’s epic drought, the lake’s salinity levels have risen sharply, leaving the turtles in a salty predicament. The combination of concentrated salt and extra sunlight has formed a hard encasing on the shells and heads of the turtles.

But it doesn’t look like these helmets will protect turtles from climate change—if anything, the endangered species’ headgear is a sign of what’s to come. The scientists noticed the turtles were in a weakened state when they spotted them around the lake. Instead of trying to flee, the turtles seemed stuck in place. The scientists are not sure what effect the helmets are having on the turtles’ health. 

A number of the turtles, known as Emys pallida, were moved from Lake Elizabeth to a freshwater pool on the roof of UCLA’s Botany Building. As water levels in the turtles’ former home have dropped, alkaline levels have increased.

The biologists taking care of the turtles are working with the Turtle Conservancy to replenish the population in a controlled environment—they will be returned to Lake Elizabeth once winter rain refills the water supply. 

The California drought will persist, despite recent heavy rainfall. 

“This has been three consecutive years of extreme dryness, and that extreme dryness translates to much lower groundwater levels, and very dry soils. It’s going to take a lot of rain to break this drought,” Jeffrey Mount, a senior fellow with Public Policy Institute of California, told KQED

The California Department of Water Resources estimates that 1.5 times the amount of current rainfall a year is needed to end the drought. 

rhamphotheca:

Team Tracks Threatened Tortoises at Yuma Proving Grounds (AZ)

by Mark Schauer, The (YPG) Outpost

With November here, the Yuma Proving Ground’s population of Sonoran Desert Tortoises are preparing for brumation, the reptilian equivalent to hibernation. 

Humans responsible for their stewardship, however, are celebrating a year of discovery about the desert creatures.

“We learned more this season about tortoises in this region than has ever been known,” said Daniel Steward, YPG wildlife biologist.

To facilitate YPG’s important mission while at the same time conserving the proving ground’s wildlife population, wildlife biologists have actively sought to determine where populations of desert tortoises live, searching for the creatures in plots of land most likely to have them present. Steward says that, unlike the Mojave Tortoise, which isn’t found at YPG, Sonoran Tortoises prefer rocky areas with lots of shelter sites…

(read more: Yuma Sun)

mymodernmet:

When a vet, Dr. Carsten Plischke, discovered that Blade the tortoise was unable to walk due to a growth disorder, he used his son’s LEGO bricks to build a mini “wheelchair” to help the little tortoise roll around while his limbs healed.

Lego to the rescue!! Sweet wheels Blade! I once thought about building Zoya an enclosure out of legos.. but I thought through and passed. This is a much better idea. Blade, you’ve got a  lifetime of troublemaking ahead of you! Enjoy it! 

mymodernmet:

When a vet, Dr. Carsten Plischke, discovered that Blade the tortoise was unable to walk due to a growth disorder, he used his son’s LEGO bricks to build a mini “wheelchair” to help the little tortoise roll around while his limbs healed.

Lego to the rescue!! Sweet wheels Blade! I once thought about building Zoya an enclosure out of legos.. but I thought through and passed. This is a much better idea. Blade, you’ve got a  lifetime of troublemaking ahead of you! Enjoy it! 

mymodernmet:

When a vet, Dr. Carsten Plischke, discovered that Blade the tortoise was unable to walk due to a growth disorder, he used his son’s LEGO bricks to build a mini “wheelchair” to help the little tortoise roll around while his limbs healed.

Lego to the rescue!! Sweet wheels Blade! I once thought about building Zoya an enclosure out of legos.. but I thought through and passed. This is a much better idea. Blade, you’ve got a  lifetime of troublemaking ahead of you! Enjoy it! 

mymodernmet:

When a vet, Dr. Carsten Plischke, discovered that Blade the tortoise was unable to walk due to a growth disorder, he used his son’s LEGO bricks to build a mini “wheelchair” to help the little tortoise roll around while his limbs healed.

Lego to the rescue!! Sweet wheels Blade! I once thought about building Zoya an enclosure out of legos.. but I thought through and passed. This is a much better idea. Blade, you’ve got a  lifetime of troublemaking ahead of you! Enjoy it! 

mymodernmet:

When a vet, Dr. Carsten Plischke, discovered that Blade the tortoise was unable to walk due to a growth disorder, he used his son’s LEGO bricks to build a mini “wheelchair” to help the little tortoise roll around while his limbs healed.

Lego to the rescue!! Sweet wheels Blade! I once thought about building Zoya an enclosure out of legos.. but I thought through and passed. This is a much better idea. Blade, you’ve got a  lifetime of troublemaking ahead of you! Enjoy it! 

Is it ok to paint my turtles shell? Answer: NO! 
I get many asks about painting a tortoise or turtle’s shell. “Whats the big deal? Isn’t it like painting your nails?”
NO.
There are several reasons this is extremely detrimental to their well being:
  • You’re blocking UV rays from being absorbed, this impedes their ability to get the needed vitamins for healthy growth from sun/light, etc! Without UVB they aren’t able to metabolize calcium.
  • Chemicals from the paint can be absorbed into the bloodstream through the shell and can taint the water the animal soaks in, being even more directly absorbed into the blood stream.
  • The fumes alone can cause respiratory issues, one of the leading causes of death in turtles and tortoises.
  • For wild turtles and tortoises? You are not only harming them with chemicals and inability to absorb needed vitamins, you are taking away their natural ability to avoid predators. 
These are just some basics on why its simply not ok to paint a turtle or tortoise. We’ve got to remember that the shell isn’t like a “hat” , Turtles and tortoises aren’t living in a cardboard box they walk around wearing. Their shell is like their skin. 
About The Turtles In the photo 
WAYNESBORO, Va. — Please stop painting turtles. That is the message The Wildlife Center of Virginia has for people who might find a turtle wandering through their yard. The center posted that message online this week after a Lynchburg woman found an adult Eastern Box Turtle covered in pink latex paint.
“Other than the paint, the turtle was in good condition and had no injuries,”  The Wildlife Center said. “Staff [members] began short scrubbing sessions each day to remove the latex paint; within a week, the team had most of the paint removed. The turtle should be able to be released in the spring. Turtles must be released back into their small home range for the best chance of survival.”

The Wildlife Center said it had experience dealing with painted turtles.

“In 2013, a very bright and colorfully painted turtle was admitted from the Natural Chimneys Campground,” the center said.

To hammer home its point, the center created Wilson’s “Turtle Promise.” It urged people to leave turtles alone and not to keep a wild turtle as a pet.

Click here to read more “turtle tips” from the Wildlife Center of Virginia.

Is it ok to paint my turtles shell? Answer: NO! 
I get many asks about painting a tortoise or turtle’s shell. “Whats the big deal? Isn’t it like painting your nails?”
NO.
There are several reasons this is extremely detrimental to their well being:
  • You’re blocking UV rays from being absorbed, this impedes their ability to get the needed vitamins for healthy growth from sun/light, etc! Without UVB they aren’t able to metabolize calcium.
  • Chemicals from the paint can be absorbed into the bloodstream through the shell and can taint the water the animal soaks in, being even more directly absorbed into the blood stream.
  • The fumes alone can cause respiratory issues, one of the leading causes of death in turtles and tortoises.
  • For wild turtles and tortoises? You are not only harming them with chemicals and inability to absorb needed vitamins, you are taking away their natural ability to avoid predators. 
These are just some basics on why its simply not ok to paint a turtle or tortoise. We’ve got to remember that the shell isn’t like a “hat” , Turtles and tortoises aren’t living in a cardboard box they walk around wearing. Their shell is like their skin. 
About The Turtles In the photo 
WAYNESBORO, Va. — Please stop painting turtles. That is the message The Wildlife Center of Virginia has for people who might find a turtle wandering through their yard. The center posted that message online this week after a Lynchburg woman found an adult Eastern Box Turtle covered in pink latex paint.
“Other than the paint, the turtle was in good condition and had no injuries,”  The Wildlife Center said. “Staff [members] began short scrubbing sessions each day to remove the latex paint; within a week, the team had most of the paint removed. The turtle should be able to be released in the spring. Turtles must be released back into their small home range for the best chance of survival.”

The Wildlife Center said it had experience dealing with painted turtles.

“In 2013, a very bright and colorfully painted turtle was admitted from the Natural Chimneys Campground,” the center said.

To hammer home its point, the center created Wilson’s “Turtle Promise.” It urged people to leave turtles alone and not to keep a wild turtle as a pet.

Click here to read more “turtle tips” from the Wildlife Center of Virginia.

Is it ok to paint my turtles shell? Answer: NO! 
I get many asks about painting a tortoise or turtle’s shell. “Whats the big deal? Isn’t it like painting your nails?”
NO.
There are several reasons this is extremely detrimental to their well being:
  • You’re blocking UV rays from being absorbed, this impedes their ability to get the needed vitamins for healthy growth from sun/light, etc! Without UVB they aren’t able to metabolize calcium.
  • Chemicals from the paint can be absorbed into the bloodstream through the shell and can taint the water the animal soaks in, being even more directly absorbed into the blood stream.
  • The fumes alone can cause respiratory issues, one of the leading causes of death in turtles and tortoises.
  • For wild turtles and tortoises? You are not only harming them with chemicals and inability to absorb needed vitamins, you are taking away their natural ability to avoid predators. 
These are just some basics on why its simply not ok to paint a turtle or tortoise. We’ve got to remember that the shell isn’t like a “hat” , Turtles and tortoises aren’t living in a cardboard box they walk around wearing. Their shell is like their skin. 
About The Turtles In the photo 
WAYNESBORO, Va. — Please stop painting turtles. That is the message The Wildlife Center of Virginia has for people who might find a turtle wandering through their yard. The center posted that message online this week after a Lynchburg woman found an adult Eastern Box Turtle covered in pink latex paint.
“Other than the paint, the turtle was in good condition and had no injuries,”  The Wildlife Center said. “Staff [members] began short scrubbing sessions each day to remove the latex paint; within a week, the team had most of the paint removed. The turtle should be able to be released in the spring. Turtles must be released back into their small home range for the best chance of survival.”

The Wildlife Center said it had experience dealing with painted turtles.

“In 2013, a very bright and colorfully painted turtle was admitted from the Natural Chimneys Campground,” the center said.

To hammer home its point, the center created Wilson’s “Turtle Promise.” It urged people to leave turtles alone and not to keep a wild turtle as a pet.

Click here to read more “turtle tips” from the Wildlife Center of Virginia.

socalconnected:

For the last 25 years, desert tortoises have been listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Urbanization, disease, and fragmentation of the desert have put these reptiles in danger. Find out why these days, you’re more likely to find a desert tortoise living in a suburban backyard than the desert, their natural habitat. Nick Hardcastle chats with the California Turtle and Tortoise Club about the process involved with tortoise adoption, and visits the home of a SoCal family that has recently adopted Rocky, a 25-year-old desert tortoise. Don’t miss it on Wednesday at 8 p.m. Visit bit.ly/tortoiseadoption for more info.
#tortoise #deserttortoise #tortoiseadoption #turtle #californiaturtleandtortoiseclub #surburban #desert #socal #southerncalifornia #kcet #socalconnected
(at Van Nuys, California)