typhlonectes:

Chinese Yellow-margined Box Turtle, Cuora flavomarginata, ENDANGERED, from Eastern And Central China and Taiwan.

photographs by Dick Bartlett (used w/ permission)

Tell me that gorgeous shell isn’t a work of art. What an beautiful shell baby!

gettinghardertoshowit:

SMILE 🐢

💚

Friends! We love turtles and torts but please, when you see an animal in the wild take care when taking pictures of them! Do not approach them unnecessarily simply to take a selfie! 

As cute as this may seem, that shell doesn’t open its mouth like that to smile. It’s not happy to pose for you! It’s likely distressed. It’s not on the beach to hang out with you either! It could be nesting (an arduous process that takes an incredible amount of energy and effort from the animal and should be left alone) or it could be ill (which requires professional assistance and maybe you could call someone instead of taking all the pictures).  

I do not know the context of this photo so there may be extenuating circumstances that make this somehow ok, but that’s not provided here and after we had a sea turtle trampled by tourists taking photos with it this summer, I can’t stand to see so many of these images showing up. This is an ENDANGERED ANIMAL! The loss of a single animal to a situation like this will impact the population long term! it’s no joke. 

So please, when on vacation, at the beach, whatever…  Take a selfie from afar. take a picture with Zoom. Make sure the animal is safe and well and reconsider doing things like this. 

DESERT TORTOISE TRAPPED IN MINE SHAFT FOR DAYS IS SAVED

(Via KVOA Tucson

A kind human was off-roading in the desert when he noticed something unusual down an old abandoned mine shaft, an endangered desert tortoise! The shaft was aprox. 20 ft deep and 30 ft wide with walls too steep for him to reach the tortoise safely, so he contacted the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD) with GPS coordinates and directions to the mine.

Given how deep the mine was, the AZGFD’s wildlife management waited till morning and headed out to rescue the tortoise. Using an extension ladder, repelling ropes, and determination, they were able to reach this little guy and carry him out of the mine!

He was incredibly dehydrated and emaciated and unfortunately unfit to be released into the wild on the spot. His rescuers gave him a good soak and brought him back to be cared for through the winter months. Rumor has it he’s gaining weight like a champ, getting all the spoils he deserves after that scary trip down the mine.

(Via Arizona Game and Fish Department Facebook)  

The tortoise was extremely dehydrated and very emaciated, he had been in there for quite a while. We immediately soaked him in the field, but after looking at him closely, we found he was extremely light, had scarring on his legs, a swollen joint on his back leg, and had worn down his front toenails to nothing. We made the determination if we released him he probably would not make it through the winter. It was already late fall, he was in very poor shape, and he would never be able to gain sustenance so late in the fall. With his front toenails completely gone, he probably would not be able to even dig a burrow in time to get out of the winter weather season; so we are rehabilitating him through the winter. He is recuperating nicely, to date he has gained almost a pound in weight and is eating regularly.

Incredible work by this good samaritan and the Arizona Game and Fish Department. Thanks to them we lost one less desert tortoise this past year. 

Kind Man Buys Turtles From Food Market And Takes Them Straight To The Sea By Hudson Hongo via The Dodo

Some fantastic human beings, Arron Cullen and his co-worker, saw two Sea Turtles for sale at a market in Papua New Guinea. Knowing they were being sold for meat, Cullen and friend purchased the two turtles and returned them to the ocean. For endangered species, saving the life of one or two of these incredible creatures, impacts both the lives of those two incredible turtles as well as their species existence. 

Way To go, Arron! 

typhlonectes:

TAKE ACTION:

More than 50,000 sea turtles could die but here’s a simple way to save their lives

Every year more than 50,000 sea turtles are killed by shrimp
trawling nets in the Southeastern waters of the United States even
though there is a simple solution that could significantly reduce this
number! The President and National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration should take this urgent action to save sea turtles’
lives. Please sign our petition if you agree action must be taken
immediately…

(GO HERE TO LEARN MORE)

(sources: The guardian, World Animal ProtectionCatchnews.com)

Human beings have the strange tendency to destroy the very thing we revere. The sad tale of the Indian star tortoise is testament to this fact. Loved as a pet and worshiped as spiritual symbol, this magnificent creature is reeling under the threat of flourishing illegal trade.

An extensive study by World Animal Protection has raised concerns about the impact of the rampant trade on the tortoises, famed for the star-like radiating patterns on their shells.

According to the study, over 55,000 tortoises are being poached from just one site in South East India annually.

Read more about the World Animal Protection study from the source

turtleconservancy:

It’s easy to see how the Endangered Four-eyed Turtle (Sacalia quadriocellata) gets its name. This unique species is in decline due to the use of its shell in traditional Chinese medicine. The Turtle Conservancy works to mitigate the trade in species like this, along with our captive breeding efforts.

Its pretty clear.. though I might have called you 6 eyed sally!

turtleconservancy:

The Cochin Forest Cane Turtle (Vijayachelys silvatica) is a rare and secretive species from the Western Ghats of India. This species is Endangered due to hunting for bush meat, deforestation and alteration of habitat, and the illegal wildlife trade.

turtleconservancy:

Now that Black Friday and Cyber Monday have passed, don’t forget to be generous on Giving Tuesday! Everyone’s favorite turtle conservation organization needs your help!

http://www.turtleconservancy.org/support/

justanimaladay:

Radiated Tortoise (Astrochelys radiata

The Radiated Tortoise is endemic to Madagascar, preferring to live in the dry brush and thorn forests in the southern portion of the island. They graze on grasses, which make up most of their diet, but will also feed on cacti and fruits if they find them. They are very long lived, with estimated lifespans of up to 100 years. The oldest verified Radiated Tortoise belonged to the royal family of Tonga and lived to be 188 years old. 

These tortoises are classed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN, as they have disappeared from 40% of their native range, and are experiencing ongoing population decline. In fact, it is estimated that they will be extinct within the next 50 years if current trends continue. Threats to the population are mainly habitat loss due to human expansion, and exploitation for the pet trade and for food by local people. 

justanimaladay:

Radiated Tortoise (Astrochelys radiata

The Radiated Tortoise is endemic to Madagascar, preferring to live in the dry brush and thorn forests in the southern portion of the island. They graze on grasses, which make up most of their diet, but will also feed on cacti and fruits if they find them. They are very long lived, with estimated lifespans of up to 100 years. The oldest verified Radiated Tortoise belonged to the royal family of Tonga and lived to be 188 years old. 

These tortoises are classed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN, as they have disappeared from 40% of their native range, and are experiencing ongoing population decline. In fact, it is estimated that they will be extinct within the next 50 years if current trends continue. Threats to the population are mainly habitat loss due to human expansion, and exploitation for the pet trade and for food by local people. 

justanimaladay:

Radiated Tortoise (Astrochelys radiata

The Radiated Tortoise is endemic to Madagascar, preferring to live in the dry brush and thorn forests in the southern portion of the island. They graze on grasses, which make up most of their diet, but will also feed on cacti and fruits if they find them. They are very long lived, with estimated lifespans of up to 100 years. The oldest verified Radiated Tortoise belonged to the royal family of Tonga and lived to be 188 years old. 

These tortoises are classed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN, as they have disappeared from 40% of their native range, and are experiencing ongoing population decline. In fact, it is estimated that they will be extinct within the next 50 years if current trends continue. Threats to the population are mainly habitat loss due to human expansion, and exploitation for the pet trade and for food by local people.