Today’s featured organization is @tortoiserescue aka American Tortoise Rescue! 
A fantastic resource for owners, advocates, and educators alike, The American Tortoise Rescue is responsible for starting World Turtle Day, bringing attention to a wide range of issues facing turtles and tortoises, as well as being a special needs turtle/tortoise sanctuary. 
About American Tortoise Rescue (From their site):
American Tortoise Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization founded in 1990 to provide for the protection of all species of tortoise and turtle.  We offer permanent sanctuary to abandoned and lost tortoises though we no longer do adoptions.  Special needs turtles and tortoises that cannot be placed stay in the care of American Tortoise Rescue for the remainder of their lives. 
Since its inception, American Tortoise Rescue has rescued well over 3,000 turtles and tortoises of all species with 70 percent being land tortoises and the remainder water turtles.  The in-house population “floats” at about 125.
their other achievements include:
  • Implementing a national campaign to stop the sale of a specific species of tortoise called sulcatas, which are being mistreated and sold illegally throughout the U.S.
  • Helping to stop the cruel sale of turtles and other exotic animals in an section of Los Angeles called Santee Alley.  Because of our video presentation before the Animal Control Commission, officers now continually monitor the situation and make arrests.
  • Bringing to light the cruel sale of water turtles in asian markets throughout the US. These animals were kept in unsanitary, cruel conditions including upside down, without food, water, or shade.
  • Creating a campaign called Turtle Ambassadors to teach awareness among school children about turtles and tortoises.
  • Developing a national campaign to stop the sale of reptiles in pet stores.
  • Producing a series of videos about turtles and tortoises, which is distributed to media and other places with large audiences.
How you can help:
Financial donations can be made online or checks can be sent by mail to The ‘Rosie fund’ is named after a special tort that changed the lives of the organizations founders. Give her story a read. 
ATR also accepts material donations, a list of needed items is also available on the bottom of the page. 
Support them using Amazon Smile! (.5% of every purchase you make will go to the organization) Just click here to set them as your amazon smile organization of choice). 
Social Media: 
Follow them on twitter @tortoiserescue
Donations of materials or checks can be sent to the following address:
American Tortoise Rescue

30765 Pacific Coast Highway, # 243
Malibu, CA 90265

The Tiger Frances Foundation: A non profit organization

The Tiger Frances Foundation: A non profit organization

positivethinkingforlosers:

Hey all a big #FF to @TigerFrances an incredible foundation working to eliminate animal abuse & rescue furry friends in need! Join the cause, Donate and join the mailing list for news and updates. You won’t regret it! 

@LittleRESq : An inspiring story of turtle/tortoise love and a call to action for all of us! 

@LittleRESQ is awe inspiring in many ways. Because of the incredible work they’ve done to rehabilitate Red Eared Sliders and other turtles, educating the public on the impact of poor care through their awesome spokes turtle Audrey R Slider, and because the hub of LittleRESq is run by Marc Ouellette in his 2 bedroom apartment.

Thats right, a 2 bedroom apartment. Started in 2008, out of a love of turtles from childhood, Ouellette and a few hard working volunteers run this fantastic rescue.  Increasing number of needy turtles, tortoises, and other reptiles continue to increase the numbers of animals being rehabilitated by LittleRESq. Their space is limited and resources are slim, yet the work they do continues to be incredibly impactful for those animals fallen victim to poor care and abuse. 

Take a minute to read the article from the Torontoist and visit http://www.littleresq.net/  to learn more about the amazing work being done. The rescue is in need of a larger space and that costs money. Every penny helps. Donate if you can, and spread the word! 

(Source: Torontoist)

Ouellette has loved turtles all his life. (His first one, Apollo, is about to turn 24, which is middle aged by turtle standards.) He started Little RES Q in 2008 after realizing there was a need. He says that red-eared sliders are abandoned and released into the wild with alarming frequency.

“People buy this little toonie-sized turtle at the pet store for $20, and it’s like, ‘OK, I can put that in a little tank,’ but within three years, the females get up to two or three pounds, the boys weigh about a pound” he says. “Then you need a bigger tank and filtration system and that costs so many hundreds of dollars…It gets too expensive, and then they don’t realize turtles can live up to 50 years.”

The problem with releasing pet sliders into the wild isn’t that they can’t fend for themselves. It’s that Ontario’s native turtles can’t fend them off. Sliders have an indigenous territory that stretches from Ohio to Mexico, but they’re hardy and reproduce quickly. This makes them a pet turtle of choice, but it has also earned them a place on the World Conservation Union’s list of the world’s 100 most invasive species.

“They’re generalists, so they can adapt to our climate,” Ouellette says. “Then, they’ll just muscle out our native turtles like the painted turtle…They turn feral and aggressive very quickly.”

Ouellette says that he doesn’t find new homes for his foster turtles very frequently, partially because there are already so many sliders in pet stores, and partially because he carefully screens potential adoptees.

“There have been people who want to take a turtle home and say, ‘Well, I’ll put it in a bucket and take care of it later,’” he says. “Well, no. You need to have a set up before you take it in. We don’t want to see that turtle coming back.”

Ouellette has recently started taking in other abandoned reptiles.

“Because we’ve turned into one of the more reputable rescues for reptiles in Toronto, we get recommended a lot,” he says. “So when people call a pet store or whatever and say, ‘I have a snake I need to get rid of,’ we’re usually the first one people call.”

Ouellette and his Little RES Q colleagues are trying to make sure that fewer turtles end up homeless by working on outreach and education. They’ve started publishing pamphlets in multiple languages, and are a regular feature at reptile shows.

“As much as I love what I do, if there came a time when I didn’t have to do this, that would be great,” he says. “It’s just a matter of education. People need to know what these turtles are like at their adult size. They need to know what a turtle needs and how big they get.”

He acknowledges that people probably won’t stop surrendering turtles in the near future, so he’s working on expanding his operation. He recently applied for registered charity status.

“Hopefully we can get a donated space, so I don’t have to do this all out of my home,” he says.

Photos courtesy of Little RES Q.

Article from The Torontoist

@LittleRESq : An inspiring story of turtle/tortoise love and a call to action for all of us! 

@LittleRESQ is awe inspiring in many ways. Because of the incredible work they’ve done to rehabilitate Red Eared Sliders and other turtles, educating the public on the impact of poor care through their awesome spokes turtle Audrey R Slider, and because the hub of LittleRESq is run by Marc Ouellette in his 2 bedroom apartment.

Thats right, a 2 bedroom apartment. Started in 2008, out of a love of turtles from childhood, Ouellette and a few hard working volunteers run this fantastic rescue.  Increasing number of needy turtles, tortoises, and other reptiles continue to increase the numbers of animals being rehabilitated by LittleRESq. Their space is limited and resources are slim, yet the work they do continues to be incredibly impactful for those animals fallen victim to poor care and abuse. 

Take a minute to read the article from the Torontoist and visit http://www.littleresq.net/  to learn more about the amazing work being done. The rescue is in need of a larger space and that costs money. Every penny helps. Donate if you can, and spread the word! 

(Source: Torontoist)

Ouellette has loved turtles all his life. (His first one, Apollo, is about to turn 24, which is middle aged by turtle standards.) He started Little RES Q in 2008 after realizing there was a need. He says that red-eared sliders are abandoned and released into the wild with alarming frequency.

“People buy this little toonie-sized turtle at the pet store for $20, and it’s like, ‘OK, I can put that in a little tank,’ but within three years, the females get up to two or three pounds, the boys weigh about a pound” he says. “Then you need a bigger tank and filtration system and that costs so many hundreds of dollars…It gets too expensive, and then they don’t realize turtles can live up to 50 years.”

The problem with releasing pet sliders into the wild isn’t that they can’t fend for themselves. It’s that Ontario’s native turtles can’t fend them off. Sliders have an indigenous territory that stretches from Ohio to Mexico, but they’re hardy and reproduce quickly. This makes them a pet turtle of choice, but it has also earned them a place on the World Conservation Union’s list of the world’s 100 most invasive species.

“They’re generalists, so they can adapt to our climate,” Ouellette says. “Then, they’ll just muscle out our native turtles like the painted turtle…They turn feral and aggressive very quickly.”

Ouellette says that he doesn’t find new homes for his foster turtles very frequently, partially because there are already so many sliders in pet stores, and partially because he carefully screens potential adoptees.

“There have been people who want to take a turtle home and say, ‘Well, I’ll put it in a bucket and take care of it later,’” he says. “Well, no. You need to have a set up before you take it in. We don’t want to see that turtle coming back.”

Ouellette has recently started taking in other abandoned reptiles.

“Because we’ve turned into one of the more reputable rescues for reptiles in Toronto, we get recommended a lot,” he says. “So when people call a pet store or whatever and say, ‘I have a snake I need to get rid of,’ we’re usually the first one people call.”

Ouellette and his Little RES Q colleagues are trying to make sure that fewer turtles end up homeless by working on outreach and education. They’ve started publishing pamphlets in multiple languages, and are a regular feature at reptile shows.

“As much as I love what I do, if there came a time when I didn’t have to do this, that would be great,” he says. “It’s just a matter of education. People need to know what these turtles are like at their adult size. They need to know what a turtle needs and how big they get.”

He acknowledges that people probably won’t stop surrendering turtles in the near future, so he’s working on expanding his operation. He recently applied for registered charity status.

“Hopefully we can get a donated space, so I don’t have to do this all out of my home,” he says.

Photos courtesy of Little RES Q.

Article from The Torontoist

@LittleRESq : An inspiring story of turtle/tortoise love and a call to action for all of us! 

@LittleRESQ is awe inspiring in many ways. Because of the incredible work they’ve done to rehabilitate Red Eared Sliders and other turtles, educating the public on the impact of poor care through their awesome spokes turtle Audrey R Slider, and because the hub of LittleRESq is run by Marc Ouellette in his 2 bedroom apartment.

Thats right, a 2 bedroom apartment. Started in 2008, out of a love of turtles from childhood, Ouellette and a few hard working volunteers run this fantastic rescue.  Increasing number of needy turtles, tortoises, and other reptiles continue to increase the numbers of animals being rehabilitated by LittleRESq. Their space is limited and resources are slim, yet the work they do continues to be incredibly impactful for those animals fallen victim to poor care and abuse. 

Take a minute to read the article from the Torontoist and visit http://www.littleresq.net/  to learn more about the amazing work being done. The rescue is in need of a larger space and that costs money. Every penny helps. Donate if you can, and spread the word! 

(Source: Torontoist)

Ouellette has loved turtles all his life. (His first one, Apollo, is about to turn 24, which is middle aged by turtle standards.) He started Little RES Q in 2008 after realizing there was a need. He says that red-eared sliders are abandoned and released into the wild with alarming frequency.

“People buy this little toonie-sized turtle at the pet store for $20, and it’s like, ‘OK, I can put that in a little tank,’ but within three years, the females get up to two or three pounds, the boys weigh about a pound” he says. “Then you need a bigger tank and filtration system and that costs so many hundreds of dollars…It gets too expensive, and then they don’t realize turtles can live up to 50 years.”

The problem with releasing pet sliders into the wild isn’t that they can’t fend for themselves. It’s that Ontario’s native turtles can’t fend them off. Sliders have an indigenous territory that stretches from Ohio to Mexico, but they’re hardy and reproduce quickly. This makes them a pet turtle of choice, but it has also earned them a place on the World Conservation Union’s list of the world’s 100 most invasive species.

“They’re generalists, so they can adapt to our climate,” Ouellette says. “Then, they’ll just muscle out our native turtles like the painted turtle…They turn feral and aggressive very quickly.”

Ouellette says that he doesn’t find new homes for his foster turtles very frequently, partially because there are already so many sliders in pet stores, and partially because he carefully screens potential adoptees.

“There have been people who want to take a turtle home and say, ‘Well, I’ll put it in a bucket and take care of it later,’” he says. “Well, no. You need to have a set up before you take it in. We don’t want to see that turtle coming back.”

Ouellette has recently started taking in other abandoned reptiles.

“Because we’ve turned into one of the more reputable rescues for reptiles in Toronto, we get recommended a lot,” he says. “So when people call a pet store or whatever and say, ‘I have a snake I need to get rid of,’ we’re usually the first one people call.”

Ouellette and his Little RES Q colleagues are trying to make sure that fewer turtles end up homeless by working on outreach and education. They’ve started publishing pamphlets in multiple languages, and are a regular feature at reptile shows.

“As much as I love what I do, if there came a time when I didn’t have to do this, that would be great,” he says. “It’s just a matter of education. People need to know what these turtles are like at their adult size. They need to know what a turtle needs and how big they get.”

He acknowledges that people probably won’t stop surrendering turtles in the near future, so he’s working on expanding his operation. He recently applied for registered charity status.

“Hopefully we can get a donated space, so I don’t have to do this all out of my home,” he says.

Photos courtesy of Little RES Q.

Article from The Torontoist