turtlefeed:

The Trick-or-Tortoise (Trickemys halloweenii) spends most of its life hibernating in a jack-o’-lantern-shaped burrow, emerging only in late October to hunt for food high in sugar content. This ritual is both bizarre and elaborate. First, the Trick-or-Tortoise camouflages itself with a range of fanciful odds and ends. The goal of this is to appear larger and more frightening. Once the tortoise is satisfied with its appearance, it approaches unsuspecting humans and shouts “BOO” as loudly as it can (which is not very loud) hoping to extort candy from its victim. The tortoise repeats this behavior until sated, then retreats to its burrow to sleep for eleven months straight.

Although Trick-or-Tortoises intend to be terrifying, most humans think they are adorable. If you encounter a Trick-or-Tortoise it is recommended that you provide them with sugar-rich foods so they do not starve to death.

turtlefeed:

The Trick-or-Tortoise (Trickemys halloweenii) spends most of its life hibernating in a jack-o’-lantern-shaped burrow, emerging only in late October to hunt for food high in sugar content. This ritual is both bizarre and elaborate. First, the Trick-or-Tortoise camouflages itself with a range of fanciful odds and ends. The goal of this is to appear larger and more frightening. Once the tortoise is satisfied with its appearance, it approaches unsuspecting humans and shouts “BOO” as loudly as it can (which is not very loud) hoping to extort candy from its victim. The tortoise repeats this behavior until sated, then retreats to its burrow to sleep for eleven months straight.

Although Trick-or-Tortoises intend to be terrifying, most humans think they are adorable. If you encounter a Trick-or-Tortoise it is recommended that you provide them with sugar-rich foods so they do not starve to death.

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (KBAK/KBFX) — Hundreds of turtles were found Tuesday night roaming the side of Highway 58 near Highway 99 in southern California.

Some of the turtles were loose, while others were trapped in trash bags. Authorities don’t know how the turtles arrived along the highway.

Leonard Plunkett of the Kern County Chapter of the California Turtle and Tortoise Club had a theory about the situation.

“These turtles were probably going to a market somewhere,” Plunkett said. “And, the way they were bagged and stuff, somebody’s taking them to a market to eat.”

The “red ear sliders” are not a native turtle species in Kern County and can’t be released into the local waterways, according to the Turtle and Tortoise Club. Adoption efforts are underway.

Want to adopt a water turtle? Call the Turtle and Tortoise Club at (661) 809-5527 »

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (KBAK/KBFX) — Hundreds of turtles were found Tuesday night roaming the side of Highway 58 near Highway 99 in southern California.

Some of the turtles were loose, while others were trapped in trash bags. Authorities don’t know how the turtles arrived along the highway.

Leonard Plunkett of the Kern County Chapter of the California Turtle and Tortoise Club had a theory about the situation.

“These turtles were probably going to a market somewhere,” Plunkett said. “And, the way they were bagged and stuff, somebody’s taking them to a market to eat.”

The “red ear sliders” are not a native turtle species in Kern County and can’t be released into the local waterways, according to the Turtle and Tortoise Club. Adoption efforts are underway.

Want to adopt a water turtle? Call the Turtle and Tortoise Club at (661) 809-5527 >>

Tortoise Blog: Thieves dig up hibernating tortoises

Tortoise Blog: Thieves dig up hibernating tortoises