Meet Tripod, the three legged tortoise looking for a forever home! 

(via Northern Arizona Gazette)

Tripod had a rough go around with a dog leaving him with severe injuries. Thanks to the vets at the Arizona Exotic Animal Hospital, a lengthy surgery to amputate a front leg, and lots of rehabilitation, he’s recovered and ready for adoption!

Tripod’s story has a happy ending but that’s not always the case when it comes to encounters between tortoises and dogs. Many don’t realize that tortoise shells have a similar scent to raw hide and that makes them seem like prime chomping material.

“When this tortoise was brought into the veterinary clinic, the damage was so severe that it’s left front leg needed to be immediately amputated,” said Tegan Wolf, AZGFD Tortoise Adoption Program coordinator. “Tripod has since recovered nicely and gets around perfectly fine on three legs.”

As you can see, Tripod is back to dominating all the land he stomps on. He and many other desert tortoises, of varying ages, are in need of forever homes as part of Arizona’s desert tortoise conservation efforts. These tortoises are unable to be released into the wild but have long lives to lives to live.

Adopters need to have a securely enclosed yard or separate enclosure in their yard, free from potential hazards such as a dog, fire pit or unfenced pool. The enclosed area must include an appropriate shelter for the tortoise to escape Arizona’s extreme summer and winter temperatures.

If you live in the Arizona area and have the ability to commit to ~40 years of love and care, Tripod or one of his desert tortoise friends might be waiting for you! Check out more at the Arizona Game and Fish Department here:  www.azgfd.gov/tortoise

Phoenix tortoise adoption event Saturday!

Phoenix tortoise adoption event Saturday!

Are you fascinated by reptiles? Do you have a yard big enough for a dog, but no time to take one for daily walks? Is someone in your family allergic to pets with fur or feathers? If so, consider adopting a desert tortoise through the Arizona Game and Fish Department’s adoption event on Saturday, April 11.

Hey Arizona residents, did you know that the Arizona Game and Fish department conducts an annual Desert Tortoise adoption program? The breeding of captive desert tortoises and the closing of facilities, quite a few of these guys need a good home! They are a restricted species,  can only be adopted by Arizona residents, and cannot leave the state. They are captive tortoises so it is also illegal to release them into the wild (so remember that before deciding to adopt).

This year’s brood of adoptable tortoises have begun getting their check-ups to ensure they are in good health and ready for a happy forever home. Adoptions begin April 1st and about 100 tortoises of varying ages are looking for a home.

Check out the Arizona Game and Fish Department’s website for information on the species, care sheets, and an adoption application!  (Its great learning material too, even if you can’t adopt)

The information includes a great checklist for potential tortoise adopters of all kinds!

(Sources Arizona Game and Fish Department & AZ central)

rhamphotheca:

Team Tracks Threatened Tortoises at Yuma Proving Grounds (AZ)

by Mark Schauer, The (YPG) Outpost

With November here, the Yuma Proving Ground’s population of Sonoran Desert Tortoises are preparing for brumation, the reptilian equivalent to hibernation. 

Humans responsible for their stewardship, however, are celebrating a year of discovery about the desert creatures.

“We learned more this season about tortoises in this region than has ever been known,” said Daniel Steward, YPG wildlife biologist.

To facilitate YPG’s important mission while at the same time conserving the proving ground’s wildlife population, wildlife biologists have actively sought to determine where populations of desert tortoises live, searching for the creatures in plots of land most likely to have them present. Steward says that, unlike the Mojave Tortoise, which isn’t found at YPG, Sonoran Tortoises prefer rocky areas with lots of shelter sites…

(read more: Yuma Sun)

dearestptolmey:

Tortoise butts are the cutest!

Meet Roxana and Alexander. These two I just bought off of Doug Dix from Deer Fern Farms (or traded, rather, since I didn’t have a plan or a mate for my Golden Greek female, I traded her for these two flat-out, since Doug is really big into breeding patternless Golden’s and I’m really big into small pleasure like these two beauties). And yes, I have a male and female.

Anyways. These two are Moroccan tortoises. Morocco has been closed for trade/imports for quite some time now, about 20-30 years, so being able to see them, let alone buy them and breed them, is pretty rare. They’re still juveniles, so they have a bit more growing to do before I’ll let them breed, but the thought is super exciting!

Anyways, my wife and I gave them a good soak, let them hang out in the sun with Ptolmey and Medusa, and fed them a good, hardy mix of organic greens for the night.

I have to bring all four inside during the nights now. Winter is coming to Arizona, and it is not kind to the cold-blooded! So Roxana and Alexander get a nice warm towel to sleep in until morning.

We’re heading to bed, so see you soon!

dearestptolmey:

Tortoise butts are the cutest!

Meet Roxana and Alexander. These two I just bought off of Doug Dix from Deer Fern Farms (or traded, rather, since I didn’t have a plan or a mate for my Golden Greek female, I traded her for these two flat-out, since Doug is really big into breeding patternless Golden’s and I’m really big into small pleasure like these two beauties). And yes, I have a male and female.

Anyways. These two are Moroccan tortoises. Morocco has been closed for trade/imports for quite some time now, about 20-30 years, so being able to see them, let alone buy them and breed them, is pretty rare. They’re still juveniles, so they have a bit more growing to do before I’ll let them breed, but the thought is super exciting!

Anyways, my wife and I gave them a good soak, let them hang out in the sun with Ptolmey and Medusa, and fed them a good, hardy mix of organic greens for the night.

I have to bring all four inside during the nights now. Winter is coming to Arizona, and it is not kind to the cold-blooded! So Roxana and Alexander get a nice warm towel to sleep in until morning.

We’re heading to bed, so see you soon!

dearestptolmey:

Tortoise butts are the cutest!

Meet Roxana and Alexander. These two I just bought off of Doug Dix from Deer Fern Farms (or traded, rather, since I didn’t have a plan or a mate for my Golden Greek female, I traded her for these two flat-out, since Doug is really big into breeding patternless Golden’s and I’m really big into small pleasure like these two beauties). And yes, I have a male and female.

Anyways. These two are Moroccan tortoises. Morocco has been closed for trade/imports for quite some time now, about 20-30 years, so being able to see them, let alone buy them and breed them, is pretty rare. They’re still juveniles, so they have a bit more growing to do before I’ll let them breed, but the thought is super exciting!

Anyways, my wife and I gave them a good soak, let them hang out in the sun with Ptolmey and Medusa, and fed them a good, hardy mix of organic greens for the night.

I have to bring all four inside during the nights now. Winter is coming to Arizona, and it is not kind to the cold-blooded! So Roxana and Alexander get a nice warm towel to sleep in until morning.

We’re heading to bed, so see you soon!

phoenixzoo:

If you haven’t already heard… it’s HOT in Phoenix!
When it gets this hot we’re often asked how our animals handle the heat. We provide our animals with lots of ways to keep cool including plenty of shade, pools & ponds, misters, swamp coolers, air conditioned nighthouses, ice treats and even specially designed artificial rocks and platforms that are kept cool throughout the day. We are also sure to monitor our animals closely throughout the day for any signs of heat stress. Our animals are also very good at keeping themselves cool! Here we see Ali, a 669 pound Aldabra tortoise, spending some time in his pond to keep cool!

#PhoenixZoo #Phoenix #Zoo #Arizona #photooftheday #picoftheday #instadaily #instagood #instaaz #instazoo #instanimal #hot #summer #cool #pond #pool #reptile #giant #tortoise (at Phoenix Zoo)

phoenixzoo:

If you haven’t already heard… it’s HOT in Phoenix!
When it gets this hot we’re often asked how our animals handle the heat. We provide our animals with lots of ways to keep cool including plenty of shade, pools & ponds, misters, swamp coolers, air conditioned nighthouses, ice treats and even specially designed artificial rocks and platforms that are kept cool throughout the day. We are also sure to monitor our animals closely throughout the day for any signs of heat stress. Our animals are also very good at keeping themselves cool! Here we see Ali, a 669 pound Aldabra tortoise, spending some time in his pond to keep cool!

#PhoenixZoo #Phoenix #Zoo #Arizona #photooftheday #picoftheday #instadaily #instagood #instaaz #instazoo #instanimal #hot #summer #cool #pond #pool #reptile #giant #tortoise (at Phoenix Zoo)

my home is a good home.. ask zoya!! I hope these guys find good homes with people that do their research and know what their getting into. 

Free to good home: desert tortoises

If you have a big yard and are looking for a low-maintenance pet that doesn’t need daily walks or to have its litter box changed, then the Arizona Game and Fish Department has just the pet for you.

The state agency has an abundance of captive-bred desert tortoises and is putting them up for adoption through its Tortoise Adoption Program, according to Catherine Robinson, of the Yuma Field Office of the Arizona Game and Fish Department.

“They make great pets. A desert tortoise will get about the size of a dinner plate, which isn’t bad,” Robinson said. “They do get accustomed to humans and will come out and follow you around the yard. Some people even say their tortoises will come to them when they call them.”

Robinson explained that while desert tortoises are protected in Arizona and cannot be legally collected from the wild, the breeding of captive tortoises and the return of tortoises by owners who can no longer care for them has led to a surplus of these unique animals at authorized adoption facilities. She said the facilities are at capacity and the agency is seeking people willing to adopt and care for a tortoise.

“We have been having a hard time finding people to adopt tortoises,” Robinson said. “People get tired of taking care of them because they require more effort than people think.”

….

If you are interested in adopting a desert tortoise, and live within the tortoise’s native range of Phoenix, Tucson, Bullhead City, Kingman, Lake Havasu, and the Yuma areas, send your completed application form to your nearest state-sanctioned desert tortoise adoption facility.

State-sanctioned desert tortoise adoption facilities are located in Scottsdale, Tucson, Kingman and Yuma. A link to contact information can be found at www.azgfd.gov/tortoise.

“The Game and Fish Department receives hundreds of unwanted adult and captive-born tortoises each year, which takes away resources for conservation efforts of wild tortoises,” says Cristina Jones, Arizona Game and Fish turtle biologist. “That is one reason we discourage captive breeding and only allow adoption of one tortoise per household.”

Game and Fish also encourages schools to adopt tortoises and even offers grants to build habitats. For more information on the grants, call 1-623-236-7530.

Robinson added once captive, desert tortoises can never be released back into the wild. Doing so can jeopardize other wild populations of tortoises by infecting them with diseases.

“If someone were to release an infected tortoise in the wild, it could kill off the species,” Robinson said.

James Gilbert can be reached at jgilbert@yumasun.com or 539-6854. Find him on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/YSJamesGilbert or on Twitter @YSJamesGilbert.

The Yuma Field Office of the Arizona Game and Fish Department, has an abundance of captive-bred desert tortoises now and is putting them up for adoption through its Tortoise Adoption Program. Desert tortoises can live as long as 50 to 100 years. They grow to be about 15 pounds and hibernate in the winter months. They eat plant material, including grasses and wildflowers. These unique animals are available for adoption to people who live in the the tortoise’s native range of Phoenix, Tucson, Bullhead City, Kingman, Lake Havasu, and the Yuma area.


Read more: http://www.yumasun.com/articles/tortoises-80366-tortoise-desert.html#ixzz21V5fHBjI

my home is a good home.. ask zoya!! I hope these guys find good homes with people that do their research and know what their getting into. 

Free to good home: desert tortoises

If you have a big yard and are looking for a low-maintenance pet that doesn’t need daily walks or to have its litter box changed, then the Arizona Game and Fish Department has just the pet for you.

The state agency has an abundance of captive-bred desert tortoises and is putting them up for adoption through its Tortoise Adoption Program, according to Catherine Robinson, of the Yuma Field Office of the Arizona Game and Fish Department.

“They make great pets. A desert tortoise will get about the size of a dinner plate, which isn’t bad,” Robinson said. “They do get accustomed to humans and will come out and follow you around the yard. Some people even say their tortoises will come to them when they call them.”

Robinson explained that while desert tortoises are protected in Arizona and cannot be legally collected from the wild, the breeding of captive tortoises and the return of tortoises by owners who can no longer care for them has led to a surplus of these unique animals at authorized adoption facilities. She said the facilities are at capacity and the agency is seeking people willing to adopt and care for a tortoise.

“We have been having a hard time finding people to adopt tortoises,” Robinson said. “People get tired of taking care of them because they require more effort than people think.”

….

If you are interested in adopting a desert tortoise, and live within the tortoise’s native range of Phoenix, Tucson, Bullhead City, Kingman, Lake Havasu, and the Yuma areas, send your completed application form to your nearest state-sanctioned desert tortoise adoption facility.

State-sanctioned desert tortoise adoption facilities are located in Scottsdale, Tucson, Kingman and Yuma. A link to contact information can be found at www.azgfd.gov/tortoise.

“The Game and Fish Department receives hundreds of unwanted adult and captive-born tortoises each year, which takes away resources for conservation efforts of wild tortoises,” says Cristina Jones, Arizona Game and Fish turtle biologist. “That is one reason we discourage captive breeding and only allow adoption of one tortoise per household.”

Game and Fish also encourages schools to adopt tortoises and even offers grants to build habitats. For more information on the grants, call 1-623-236-7530.

Robinson added once captive, desert tortoises can never be released back into the wild. Doing so can jeopardize other wild populations of tortoises by infecting them with diseases.

“If someone were to release an infected tortoise in the wild, it could kill off the species,” Robinson said.

James Gilbert can be reached at jgilbert@yumasun.com or 539-6854. Find him on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/YSJamesGilbert or on Twitter @YSJamesGilbert.

The Yuma Field Office of the Arizona Game and Fish Department, has an abundance of captive-bred desert tortoises now and is putting them up for adoption through its Tortoise Adoption Program. Desert tortoises can live as long as 50 to 100 years. They grow to be about 15 pounds and hibernate in the winter months. They eat plant material, including grasses and wildflowers. These unique animals are available for adoption to people who live in the the tortoise’s native range of Phoenix, Tucson, Bullhead City, Kingman, Lake Havasu, and the Yuma area.


Read more: http://www.yumasun.com/articles/tortoises-80366-tortoise-desert.html#ixzz21V5fHBjI