A Sulcata tortoise, thought to have been abandoned in a man’s driveway on new years day, was not actually abandoned at all. After making the news at the first of the year, and plenty of offers to take her home, the tortoises owners were identified and she was returned home. Turns out she, like many of her shell friends, is a talented escape artist and made her way over from a neighbor’s home. 

Check out this follow-up report on KITV4 on this gals happy ending. Especially interesting to note in this short video? Even though these tortoises are not native to Hawaii, they are actually doing a good job serving the environment.  These shells are doing a good job of noming away invasive weeds, clearing the way for (and fertilizing I’d guess) the native plant life. 

Just another reason to love em. 

(Source KITV Honolulu)

A well traveled tortoise is back where he belongs.

Rarely does a tortoise become a top story, but a reptile has been getting all sorts of attention after getting lost. Now, this tortoise story comes with a happy ending.

The phone had been ringing off the hook at State Representative John Mizuno’s office. Dozens of people wanted to talk about a large tortoise found on Oahu’s Windward side.

“We’ve had over 60 calls and over 100 emails to my office,” said Mizuno.

Many of those who called or emailed believed the wayward tortoise was their missing pet.

“We got at least 20 different people who claim that’s their tortoise,” said Mizuno.

It turned the tortoise wasn’t dumped in the Kaneohe yard where it was found. Instead, it escaped from a neighbor.

Tortoise expert Jim Juvik was not surprised to hear that about reptiles known for burrowing.

“They dig very deep burrows, 20­30 feet long. They love to burrow. When they get bigger they like to burrow under things like your foundation. They’re very strong. They can punch through wood fences, so they are always escaping,” said Juvik.

African Spurred tortoises are also known as sulcata tortoises. But Juvik has another name for them: suburban time bombs.

“In Southern California in the 1980s people were breeding them up, and selling them in pet stores. Everyone had a little one in their backyard. We’re calling them suburban time bombs because 20­30 years later the tortoises are big, and people are saying, ‘I’m not ready for this’,” said Juvik.

How big can they get?
Males grow bigger than the females and can weigh up to 200 pounds. They can also live to 150 years old.

The tortoises gobble up fresh vegetables and also eat grasses.

Instead of becoming a suburban time bomb in Hawaii, some say they could be used to help native forest restoration projects. Unwanted reptiles are already eating up invasive plants on the Garden Isle.

“We put them into our enclosures on Kauai and they eat the weeds. They don’t eat the native plants, which is just the opposite of the deer, goats, pigs, everything else we have introduced into Hawaii,” said Juvik.

Juvik said many pet owners just aren’t prepared for growing challenges of the ever­growing tortoises. For those thinking about getting these reptiles or who already have one, check out

www.turtleconservancy.org for more useful information.

hervengeance:

#mother #tortoise quality time. Hank had a bath and mommy is #reading to him while he dries and basks. Look how he’s hugging me.
Real talk: he’s so heavy I couldn’t take a full breath. I think he caused my right lung to collapse. Four years ago I wouldn’t of felt a thing if he was on my back. Fast forward four years and I’ll be on his back.

wafflesworld:

So here’s how it’s going to go. First I’m going to steal your toast, right off the plate. Then I’m going to make a poo as big as those cupcakes you’re baking. Then I’m going to pee like you stepped on a drink box. That is all.

Tell it like it is Waffles, Zoya absolutely approves and says she has a similar plan. 

thewhimsyturtle  replied to your photo “Someone is getting some big ideas in that terrarium of hers… …”

Kirby wants to include an Article for freedom from baths. He is putting on his super-turtle cape and going to dump his bath water in the sink! If he can push it over…(Caped Kirby pics definitely coming this week once humom has time to take pics!)

YES! Zoya agrees “He [human] has plundered our excess noms, ravaged our hiding spots, disrupted our pursuit of quality basking and snuggly naps, all  in the name of the vile bath!”

Kirby should totally publish The Kirby Papers! 

wafflesworld replied to your photo “Someone is getting some big ideas in that terrarium of hers… …”

How many dandies would Zoya like in exchange for never showing this to Waffles and Mango?

Um. Zoya says she’ll take a dozen dandies and not to read that card we sent too closely… if you notice something strange its NOT a secret tortie code…

(Psst Waffles, Mango, keep practicing your shell-igraphy signature!)  

Looks like Samson is happy to be home, but enjoyed his adventures a little too. How can you resist this pose? 

(Source: MyFoxPhilly.com)

CASA GRANDE, AZ –

A giant tortoise in Arizona proves that slow and steady really does win the race!

18-year-old Samson the Tortoise escaped from his owners’ casa Grande home in November 2012. The owners say the 100-pound sulcata tortoise wandered out through an open gate after finding some alfalfa.

He roamed around for a while before someone found him 30 miles away from the home in Hidden Valley. Samson was then taken to a Maricopa foster home.

After an online posting, and a microchip in his leg, he was returned back to his owners The Plumb Family.

Mary Plumb says someone who took care of the animals, who was out in the yard, left a gate open.

13-year-old Charles Plum is thrilled to have Samson back home.

“I was coming in and my parents told me we got the tortoise back and so I just dropped my backpack and ran over here,” Charles said.

The Plumbs not only have 18 tortoises, but they take care of chickens, dozens of peacocks, tarantulas, pet snakes, 20 guinea fowls and an alpaca.

Mary says she couldn’t wait to feed Samson his favorite food apples.

Check out the Franky Cam, streaming live from atop the shell of the 17 y/o Sulcata tortoise. You can see the world from Franky’s perspective as he roams Lou’s Pet Shop in Michigan, noming some lettuce, making new friends, and probably causing some trouble (He’s a tortoise duh! ).

(Check it out here!)

The DropCam has many uses: home security, nanny cams, public safety… but frankly we think the Franky Cam is by far the best use of this wireless streaming video technology. 

(From TheNewYorkTimes )

“He gets about 10,000 viewers a month,” said Donnie Cook, the owner of Lou’s Pet Shop in Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich., where Franky, an easygoing 17-year-old, spends his days transmitting over the Internet a nonstop tortoise-eye view of the world. “We get people from at least 30 states, plus Italy, France.” A family in California has even sent the store $50 to keep Franky in lettuce.

Check out the Franky Cam, streaming live from atop the shell of the 17 y/o Sulcata tortoise. You can see the world from Franky’s perspective as he roams Lou’s Pet Shop in Michigan, noming some lettuce, making new friends, and probably causing some trouble (He’s a tortoise duh! ).

(Check it out here!)

The DropCam has many uses: home security, nanny cams, public safety… but frankly we think the Franky Cam is by far the best use of this wireless streaming video technology. 

(From TheNewYorkTimes )

“He gets about 10,000 viewers a month,” said Donnie Cook, the owner of Lou’s Pet Shop in Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich., where Franky, an easygoing 17-year-old, spends his days transmitting over the Internet a nonstop tortoise-eye view of the world. “We get people from at least 30 states, plus Italy, France.” A family in California has even sent the store $50 to keep Franky in lettuce.

Check out the Franky Cam, streaming live from atop the shell of the 17 y/o Sulcata tortoise. You can see the world from Franky’s perspective as he roams Lou’s Pet Shop in Michigan, noming some lettuce, making new friends, and probably causing some trouble (He’s a tortoise duh! ).

(Check it out here!)

The DropCam has many uses: home security, nanny cams, public safety… but frankly we think the Franky Cam is by far the best use of this wireless streaming video technology. 

(From TheNewYorkTimes )

“He gets about 10,000 viewers a month,” said Donnie Cook, the owner of Lou’s Pet Shop in Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich., where Franky, an easygoing 17-year-old, spends his days transmitting over the Internet a nonstop tortoise-eye view of the world. “We get people from at least 30 states, plus Italy, France.” A family in California has even sent the store $50 to keep Franky in lettuce.

Holiday Togetherness – Interspeices noms edition 

Holiday Togetherness – Interspeices noms edition 

Holiday Togetherness – Interspeices noms edition 

Holiday Togetherness – Interspeices noms edition 

Holiday Togetherness – Interspeices noms edition 

Holiday Togetherness – Interspeices noms edition 

Holiday Togetherness – Interspeices noms edition