Anonymous asked: Your blog is WIN! thats not really a question… but I am sending it anyway.

fortheloveofreptiles:

Haha Thanks! I really appreciate it do you have any reptiles you would like me to post?

Turtles and tortoises are our heart and soul here. Love any and all posts about them. Do you have any info on Musk Turtles?

P.S. Tort-time peeps… if you aren’t following fortheloveofreptiles you need to get on that. 

Congrats on your accomplishment.. If you drew this you’re clearly talented! 

Since the tortoise represents patients and wisdom, keep in mind that while you learn some stuff? College sorta works to teach you that you don’t actually know anything. hah or at least thats what it did to me 🙂

shelart:

Almost 12.5% done with college. I don’t feel educated yet. Must learn more.

Endangered Species: The Egyptian Tortoise

tortoiseblog:

Thu, 08/12/2011 – 15:07

Shelled desert dweller too cute for its own good

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Photographed by Cam McGrath
A mammoth problem facing the rather miniscule Egyptian tortoise, muses one veteran conservationist, is that it is obscenely cute. One of the world’s smallest and most endangered species of tortoises, its numbers have been whittled down by the insatiable global demand for the tiny-shelled reptiles as exotic pets.

About the size of a one-pound coin at birth, and seldom exceeding 10cm in length at maturity, customs officers have found these diminutive desert creatures hidden in smugglers’ suitcases, stuffed inside toilet paper rolls, and clumsily disguised as sacks of potatoes. Thousands of Egyptian tortoises are captured and smuggled each year to light up the faces of adoring boys and girls ― and adults who should know better. It’s hardly surprising, then, that so few are left.

“There are far more Egyptian tortoises in captivity than there are left in the wild,” says Omar Attum, a biology professor at Indiana University Southeast who is working to conserve the species. “Collection for the pet trade has greatly reduced the tortoise’s numbers, but unfortunately that’s not the only threat they face.”

The Egyptian tortoise (Testudo kleinmanni) historically inhabited the scrub desert and coastal dunes of North Africa in a swath running from Tripoli to Rafah, and up to 100km inland. But not anymore. An extensive field study carried out in 1994 revealed a sizable population in Libya’s Jebel Akhdar region, but failed to locate even a single wild tortoise anywhere in Egypt, its historic heartland.

“I didn’t find any tortoises in Egypt and at the time it seemed there were none left,” says environmental consultant Sherif Baha Eddin, the ecologist who led the survey. “The species was presumed to be extinct here.”

Continue reading “Endangered Species: The Egyptian Tortoise”